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Horses Don’t Quicken

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 149 total)
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  • #146960
    Andrew Hughes
    Member
    • Total Posts 1904

    Stop being such a dork

    Any need for this? If you think the poster is wrong, then say so and expand.

    #146962
    Gazs Way De Solzen
    Member
    • Total Posts 2440

    As I remember Alan Potts had something to say on this subject in ‘Against the Crowd’ (I can’t find my copy at the moment so I am repeating from memory) but it was something along the lines that very often horses look as though they are accelerating at the end of races but in fact they are merely maintaining their speed for longer (and thus demonstrating what he called ‘power’) whilst the others are tiring.

    That would be more prevalent in races with a faster pace throughout. Such like a 100m race in athletics. The athletes are going full speed for the full duration, so when lactic acid build up is at its’ highest at the end of the race, then it will show people slowing rather than getting faster.

    However, for slower run races, then yes, people and horses can quicken up at the end. It all depends on the pace of the race beforehand.

    #146964
    crizzy
    Participant
    • Total Posts 789

    Scallywag, IMO you are not really helping Tuffers who is simply asking questions by your one line seemingly condesending comments. This is a forum where constructional comments seem more welcome. Why do you not expand and be a bit more helpful? You scallywag.

    #146965
    Drone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5457

    Sectional timing is the only way to quantify whether horses are accelerating or decelerating over a set distance, and from what velocity the change is occuring from.

    Trying to glean this from watching a race is nigh on impossible, and misleading. To the eye a horse may appear to be quickening when infact it’s actually slowing down less rapidly than the others it’s passing.

    I’ve no idea if all horses are slowing at the end of a race, but would guess the majority are.

    Cue Prufrock and Jim F?

    #146966
    scallywag76
    Member
    • Total Posts 280

    Any need for this? If you think the poster is wrong, then say so and expand.

    I already have, dork. Perhaps you’re unhappy that you’re not the arch bully after all.

    #146968
    Bulwark
    Member
    • Total Posts 3119

    As I remember Alan Potts had something to say on this subject in ‘Against the Crowd’ (I can’t find my copy at the moment so I am repeating from memory) but it was something along the lines that very often horses look as though they are accelerating at the end of races but in fact they are merely maintaining their speed for longer (and thus demonstrating what he called ‘power’) whilst the others are tiring.

    That would be more prevalent in races with a faster pace throughout. Such like a 100m race in athletics. The athletes are going full speed for the full duration, so when lactic acid build up is at its’ highest at the end of the race, then it will show people slowing rather than getting faster.

    However, for slower run races, then yes, people and horses can quicken up at the end. It all depends on the pace of the race beforehand.

    That pretty much hits the nail on the head gaz, if you have just jogged for most of a race and are full of running, you wouldnt slow down, you would accelerate (obviously until you hit your top speed and can accelerate no further), but I dont think you would slow down unless it is a race where you and/or everything else is battling on tired, with nothing left, and I agree that I have seen such races, where that is clear to be seen

    #146969
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    • Total Posts 17716

    You guys obviously think I’ve got a screw loose with my question but I’m convinced I’ve read somewhere that the final furlong is always run in a slower time than the penultimate furlong but I can’t find it anywhere on the net.

    The reason I think it’s an important point is that it illustrates (if my point is correct) how difficult it is to read a race.

    As I said earlier "Does it matter"?
    Surely any information that can be gleaned from knowing whether a horse is slowing or accelerating is also available through studying the form and pace of the race anyway?

    #146970
    Tuffers
    Member
    • Total Posts 1402

    As I remember Alan Potts had something to say on this subject in ‘Against the Crowd’ (I can’t find my copy at the moment so I am repeating from memory) but it was something along the lines that very often horses look as though they are accelerating at the end of races but in fact they are merely maintaining their speed for longer (and thus demonstrating what he called ‘power’) whilst the others are tiring.

    Good memory that man :)

    Here’s a link to Alan’s book online. The start of Chapter 2 is the relevant bit

    http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&id= … c#PPA21,M1

    #146972
    Andrew Hughes
    Member
    • Total Posts 1904

    Perhaps you’re unhappy that you’re not the arch bully after all

    Please explain

    #146973
    scallywag76
    Member
    • Total Posts 280

    Scallywag, IMO you are not really helping Tuffers who is simply asking questions by your one line seemingly condesending comments. This is a forum where constructional comments seem more welcome. Why do you not expand and be a bit more helpful? You scallywag.

    It’s not that difficult to understand really is it? Use of the word ‘quickened’ was, surely, never intended to indicate that a horse was suddenly travelling at a pace hitherto not experienced at any other stage of the race in question.

    #146977
    Tuffers
    Member
    • Total Posts 1402

    It’s not that difficult to understand really is it? Use of the word ‘quickened’ was, surely, never intended to indicate that a horse was suddenly travelling at a pace hitherto not experienced at any other stage of the race in question.

    But as this thread has shown, that’s exactly what many people think it means.

    IMHO the point I’m trying to make is critical to finding winners. It’s easy to think that a horse who appears to be finishing fast and fails to win is worth backing next time but if you understand that it isn’t speeding up at all it puts a completely different complexion on things. I love opposing horses who appear to have been unlucky fast finishing losers last time out because the misconception that those horses are actually speeding up at the finish causes them to be overbet and makes the market for me

    #146978
    scallywag76
    Member
    • Total Posts 280

    Please explain

    ooh err missus!

    #146980
    Andrew Hughes
    Member
    • Total Posts 1904

    Are the drugs particularly ripe this year on the Isle of Man?

    #146984
    MDeering
    Member
    • Total Posts 1688

    You guys obviously think I’ve got a screw loose with my question but I’m convinced I’ve read somewhere that the final furlong is always run in a slower time than the penultimate furlong but I can’t find it anywhere on the net.

    The reason I think it’s an important point is that it illustrates (if my point is correct) how difficult it is to read a race.

    Ok – fine, but we all get an immediate suggestion of what this topic is about based on your title. "Horses don’t quicken". So … which one is it?

    PS. Are we all this thin-skinned? Somebody criticises – not belittles – another poster for their comments and others are jumping up and down calling disgrace, or rudeness … whatever you wish.

    You participate in a forum of opinions and views from other posters – so one must be prepared to encounter unlikeable statements. But that’s the deal with a forum. Freedom of opinion.

    #146985
    Tuffers
    Member
    • Total Posts 1402

    Are the drugs particularly ripe this year on the Isle of Man?

    A little acronym you may like to beat in mind, Andrew is PDNFTT

    Which translates as Please Do Not Feed The Troll

    ie don’t reply to their posts it only encourages them

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