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Horses Don’t Quicken

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 149 total)
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  • #146941
    monksfield
    Member
    • Total Posts 257

    If they go a slow gallop, then they can be compared to a marathon, where runners utilise aerobic fitness more than anaerobic capacity and they have the ability to speed up at the end of their races as they don’t have a high build up of lactic acid during their race.

    Does anyone have any examples of sectional times where the final sectional is the fastest of the race?

    Dancing Brave in The Derby was pretty quick I believe.

    #146942
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    • Total Posts 17732

    Does it matter?

    #146943
    scallywag76scallywag76
    Member
    • Total Posts 280

    Isn’t the term ‘quickened’ used to indicate that a horse shows a superior turn of foot, compared to those around it, irrespective of the pace, overall, of a race. As opposed, of course, to suggesting that a quickening horse has suddenly run the final furlong in a faster time than any other stage of the race?

    #146944
    MDeeringMDeering
    Member
    • Total Posts 1688

    If they go a slow gallop, then they can be compared to a marathon, where runners utilise aerobic fitness more than anaerobic capacity and they have the ability to speed up at the end of their races as they don’t have a high build up of lactic acid during their race.

    Does anyone have any examples of sectional times where the final sectional is the fastest of the race?

    Dancing Brave in The Derby was pretty quick I believe.

    Nice one Monksfield! 10.8.

    And let’s not forget Secretariat, who performed the incredible "negative splitting" in the Belmont Stakes if I can recall.

    #146945
    Bulwark
    Member
    • Total Posts 3119

    To be fair it is pretty obvious when a horse is cantering and when a horse it all out sprinting at full stretch, you can visibly see it, a good example of a horse quickening would be binocular in his hurdling debut race, look at the way he moves throughout the race and look at how he finishes the race. Two completely different speeds, the latter being the faster, there is no way that he is going slower than throughout the race.

    If you think about it logically, if you are the fastest sprinter in a race over 1 mile then you will ideally sit at the back of the pace and hope that they set a slow pace that you can "quicken" off, alternatively you may sit at the front and cause that slow pace yourself. The difference between speed and stamina is largely why one group of horses will go to the front and one will be happy to sit at the back.

    This is hard to explain, basically in a race where all different horses are suited exactly equally to the ground, if they go a really slow pace until the last two furlongs then fastest horse over those two furlongs (ie. the one with greatest turn of foot) will win, regardless of who would have won had it been run differently. Can you understand that concept, or have I explained it badly?

    #146946
    TuffersTuffers
    Member
    • Total Posts 1402

    To everyone who has posted so far – re-read the opening post of this thread. My question was "Can we all agree that it is undisputed that ALL horses slow down at the end of a race?"

    Are any of you saying that in the final 100yards of a race horses are accelerating?

    #146947
    Bandari
    Member
    • Total Posts 22

    I think part of the problem is that watching a race can be very deceptive. It looks for the world like horses are quickening past one another.

    This is what i thought. That’s it not a case of horses quickening past each other but rather a case of one horse staying on far better than the other. Come to think of it i’m almost certain i read this in Mark Johnston’s biography.

    #146948
    Running ReinRunning Rein
    Participant
    • Total Posts 185

    The actual instances of a horse receiving the form book comment ‘quickened’ are very rare.
    Professional racereaders are, for the most part, excellent and should be,in my view, the first port of call for form study. In other words read the results section first.
    If Raceform, Timeform or RP says ‘quickened’ it almost certainly has.
    ‘Squillions’ of comments of this nature…is well wide of the mark.

    #146949
    Bulwark
    Member
    • Total Posts 3119

    To everyone who has posted so far – re-read the opening post of this thread. My question was "Can we all agree that it is undisputed that ALL horses slow down at the end of a race?"

    Are any of you saying that in the final 100yards of a race horses are accelerating?

    It depends on the race, on jumps a lot of the time horses will be wound down at the finish, but on the flat, horses tend to get boxed in and come late, or be mistimed and so definitely there are times when horses will be accelerating over the final 100 yards.

    #146951
    crizzy
    Participant
    • Total Posts 789

    Look, someone on here has asked a question which appears to some to be stupid or illogical. A discussion has opened as you would expect on a forum, but some of these responses are simply a bit rude for want of a better word. They belittle the poster who is merely asking a question. Give a full answer or leave it. Gaz/I did that and I wish I hadn’t bothered.

    #146953
    Bulwark
    Member
    • Total Posts 3119

    Thats what I am trying to do crizzy, I dont mean to come across as rude, if so, pay no heed, it is not intentional.

    #146954
    crizzy
    Participant
    • Total Posts 789

    No problem Bulwark. I wasn’t refering to you. Gaz just made a point about quickening that seemed a fair point following from mine. It was the nature of other bods that seemed abit much. Thanks for response.

    #146955
    scallywag76scallywag76
    Member
    • Total Posts 280

    Are any of you saying that in the final 100yards of a race horses are accelerating?

    Stop being such a dork.

    #146956
    TuffersTuffers
    Member
    • Total Posts 1402

    You guys obviously think I’ve got a screw loose with my question but I’m convinced I’ve read somewhere that the final furlong is always run in a slower time than the penultimate furlong but I can’t find it anywhere on the net.

    The reason I think it’s an important point is that it illustrates (if my point is correct) how difficult it is to read a race.

    #146957
    Andrew HughesAndrew Hughes
    Member
    • Total Posts 1904

    As I remember Alan Potts had something to say on this subject in ‘Against the Crowd’ (I can’t find my copy at the moment so I am repeating from memory) but it was something along the lines that very often horses look as though they are accelerating at the end of races but in fact they are merely maintaining their speed for longer (and thus demonstrating what he called ‘power’) whilst the others are tiring.

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