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Horses Don’t Quicken

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  • #6879
    TuffersTuffers
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    • Total Posts 1402

    Apologies if this one has been done before on here but I’ve noticed several posters (well one mostly) talking about horses ‘quickening’ at the end of their races. Can we all agree that it is undisputed that ALL horses slow down at the end of a race?

    #146922
    Gazs Way De SolzenGazs Way De Solzen
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    • Total Posts 2441

    It depends really on how fast they have gone during the race.

    To say a horse doesn’t have the ability to quicken up at the end of a race is physiologically incorrect.

    #146923
    Bandari
    Member
    • Total Posts 22

    I was under the impression that horses don’t quicken at the end of races, they slow down, can’t remember where i read that though. :?

    #146926
    TuffersTuffers
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    • Total Posts 1402

    It depends really on how fast they have gone during the race.

    To say a horse doesn’t have the ability to quicken up at the end of a race is physiologically incorrect.

    My point is that whatever the pace of the race horses are always slowing down at the end of it. I agree that in theory if they cantered for all but the final hundred yards then they could gallop the final hundred yards but I think it’s been shown that having run at racing pace ie a gallop horses are always slowing down at the end of a race.

    #146927
    Gazs Way De SolzenGazs Way De Solzen
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    • Total Posts 2441

    In some, yes, in others maybe not.

    The same principles apply in humans as well as in the equine variety.

    If you have a sprint, i.e. a 100m race, then yes, the lactic acid will be more prevelant due to the energy systems used and the lack of oxygen available to the muscles and the body. The same will be in shorter distance horse races such as 5f & 6f sprints, etc…

    It will also be evident in horses that don’t have great anaerobic capacity, where their ability to perform at higher intensities isn’t as good as their rivals within the races.

    If they go a slow gallop, then they can be compared to a marathon, where runners utilise aerobic fitness more than anaerobic capacity and they have the ability to speed up at the end of their races as they don’t have a high build up of lactic acid during their race.

    #146931
    crizzy
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    • Total Posts 789

    This might be a really poor comparison but with humans,when they have run the 10,000 m they can sometimes sprint to a finish, or run a really quick final lap thus quickening and running a faster final lap than the previous for example. Total rubbish? No comparison? I don’t know. Just a thought. I know where you are coming from though.

    #146932
    Gazs Way De SolzenGazs Way De Solzen
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    • Total Posts 2441

    This might be a really poor comparison but with humans,when they have run the 10,000 m they can sometimes sprint to a finish, or run a really quick final lap thus quickening and running a faster final lap than the previous for example. Total rubbish? No comparison? I don’t know. Just a thought. I know where you are coming from though.

    Yes, that is true, see my theory and logic as above.

    #146933
    scallywag76scallywag76
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    • Total Posts 280

    What a silly statement.

    #146934
    Bulwark
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    • Total Posts 3119

    IMHO horses almost always definitely do quicken, although as gaz points out this all reletive to the pace through the race. At a fast pace there is the chance that horses may move through beaten horses at a slower pace than the overall pace of the race.

    But as is the case in a great deal races (probably the vast majority) of horses are generally held in a position by the jockey, who will be aiming to preserve as much of their energy and will make their move with a burst of speed. Extreme cases of this I would refer to as jog and sprint, I have heard some people refer to them as two furlong sprints.

    I find the idea of horses always slowing down rather than quickening to be a very strange outlook, and indeed I have never heard of that before. Indeed I would suspect that it happens in a minority of races.

    #146935
    TuffersTuffers
    Member
    • Total Posts 1402

    If they go a slow gallop, then they can be compared to a marathon, where runners utilise aerobic fitness more than anaerobic capacity and they have the ability to speed up at the end of their races as they don’t have a high build up of lactic acid during their race.

    Does anyone have any examples of sectional times where the final sectional is the fastest of the race?

    #146936
    Colin Little
    Member
    • Total Posts 338

    I think part of the problem is that watching a race can be very deceptive. It looks for the world like horses are quickening past one another. As an example, have a look at the race won by Excusez Moi at LIngfield last Saturday. It almost defies belief that he was not quickening.

    #146937
    crizzy
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    • Total Posts 789

    Scallywag, Were you saying mine was a silly statement?

    #146938
    MDeeringMDeering
    Member
    • Total Posts 1688

    If they go a slow gallop, then they can be compared to a marathon, where runners utilise aerobic fitness more than anaerobic capacity and they have the ability to speed up at the end of their races as they don’t have a high build up of lactic acid during their race.

    Does anyone have any examples of sectional times where the final sectional is the fastest of the race?

    Unfair comment Tuffers. A horse is not going to jog-trot on the bridle with a furlong to go and then accelerate as such. In 2008, it’s ludicrous.

    Squillions of instances of horses "quickening" up down under, probably 3/4 of the card of races every day where from the 3F – 1F poles there is some form of improved acceleration.

    To be very candid, and the bottom line, I have not heard a more outrageous comment in my short lifetime.

    #146939
    Fist of Fury 2k8
    Member
    • Total Posts 2931

    Apologies if this one has been done before on here but I’ve noticed several posters (well one mostly) talking about horses ‘quickening’ at the end of their races. Can we all agree that it is undisputed that ALL horses slow down at the end of a race?

    This is a wind up Tuffers?

    So if Istabraq is cantering two from home cruising on the bridle

    Then his jockey grabs hold of him gives him a slap down the neck and within 20 strides he is 12 lengths clear of a horse that was next to him, what has happened at the same time as he looked like he quicked he hasn;t….what’s really happened is the horse next to him just happened to slow down at the same time I thought I saw Istabraq spread wings and leave him in his wake…………..that makes a lot of sense to me mate.. I think I’m having a bad dream here……Good night I need a break :roll:

    #146940
    MDeeringMDeering
    Member
    • Total Posts 1688

    Save your breath FOF. Good-night to you.

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