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whats in a name

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  • #4019
    runandskip
    Member
    • Total Posts 412

    so here we are, group ones on the flat have returned and the first one goes to one of hamdens with a terrible name.<br>why cant he show respect for uk racing and give his horses decent names like his brother and prince kallid does? he even looks misarable when he won.<br>would dancing brave have been so popular if he was called mujabib or something even worse?<br>was so good to see attraction win the 1,000 and see the owner enjoying it. a filly with a lovely name.

    #93235
    poplarman
    Member
    • Total Posts 1

    The horse doesn’t actually know what its racing name is. It’s more likely to respond to "Hammy" in the yard.

    Of course the worst name was RED RUM, especially if you say it backwards!

    I’m always intrigued by names that look like they were the first thing a potential owner said about them – like "Iznogood" and "Willitwin".

    I guess the bottom line is that if Mr Makhtoum wants to name his horses with names that mean something to him, than he should be allowed to get on with it.

    I was lucky enough to breed a filly from one of Sir Mark Prescott’s horses (Dark Stranger) with my own mare (Induna) – I won’t tell you what we called the filly!!<br>

    #93236
    apracing
    Participant
    • Total Posts 3106

    <br>Runandskip,

    Would you also support the Maktoums if they opted to bar all horses with English names from the Dubai metings?

    Or does your pathetic prejudice only operate in one direction?

    AP

    #93241
    Jim JTS
    Member
    • Total Posts 841

    Is it only "English" names? not Scottish, Welsh, N.Irish? :(  let’s call it British eh?

    It doesn’t bother me what a horse is called to be honest and this is yet another stupid post!

    without the Maktoums racing would have died long ago IMO.

    #93245
    pod
    Member
    • Total Posts 41

    ”When in Rome” and all that… Ian Davies may very well want to win friends and influence people but when all is said and done, invariably “He who pays the piper, calls the tuneâ€ÂÂ

    #93254
    turtle
    Member
    • Total Posts 31

    Have you ever seen our own dear Queenie jumping up and down and punching the air when a horse of hers wins, Golden Cygnet? :armbounce:<br>Maybe it’s something to do with maintaining a conventional ‘royal’ dignity, rather than a congenital arabic trait.

    As for the name thing. Quite agree.  Croeso Croeso, for instance. What sort of meaningless name is that? ;)

    (Edited by turtle at 11:29 am on May 5, 2004)

    #93257
    stevedvg
    Member
    • Total Posts 1137

    Runandskip

    That’s right, we don’t want the likes of Nayef, Alamshaar, Falbrav, Dalkhani, Sulamani etc etc over here. Or Shergar, for that matter

    Same with Azertyuiop, back to France he goes…

    No, we can make do with horses with good, English sounding names like, err … Magic Mamma’s Too

    (I read somewhere that the most common surname in England is Patel, so what is an "English name")

    Why should the Arab owners "show respect to UK racing" by giving their horses non-Arab names?

    Trust me, if a rule to that effect ever came into being, those owners would keeping giving their horses Arab names and run in Ireland and France, where the racing would be richer thanks to British parochialism.

    At the same time, British racing would become a poor cousin to the racing of our neighbours.

    I reckon we need these owners at least as much as they need us.

    Who knows, names like these may even help stimulate interest in the sport among the UK’s Muslim population.

    And we might be glad of that at a time when TV stations are reviewing viewing figures for minority sports.

    Steve

    #93258
    bigmickie
    Member
    • Total Posts 22

    interesting thread this one..not sure that the acc usation of "pathetic prejudice" from AP was merited at all.<br>personally i think that an owner can -subject to weatherbys rules-call a horse what he wants.I can see the "when in rome" argument but as long as the good horses are running here rather than say in france its not really a problem what the name is to me.<br>finally i dont think that racing would die without the arab investments ..Coolmore are more than a match IMO and yes that Maktoum chappie is a miserable git!!

    #93259
    ACR1
    Member
    • Total Posts 64

    Runandskip,

    Have to agree with AP – it looks like prejudice. At least with the Arab names, difficult as some of them are to pronounce, the letters mean what they say. Surely the Irish named horses are more deserving of your contempt?

    If you’ve no knowledge of the Irish language how are you supposed to know that Lean Ar Aghaidh should be pronounced Lan-Ar-Ay or Cead Mile Failte is Kaid-Meela-Falt-Ya?

    Why not demand that the Paddies start showing some respect for UK racing or does your xenophobia just stretch to the Arabs?

    (Edited by ACR1 at 12:20 pm on May 5, 2004)

    #93262
    stevedvg
    Member
    • Total Posts 1137

    Coolmore are more than a match IMO

    From the stats section in the RP website, Sue Magnier and M Tabor had, between them, 82 UK runners on the flat in 2003 (14 winners)

    Compare this with K Abdulla who had 79 winners from 357 or laughing boy who had 103 winners from 524.

    6 of the top 7 owners last year were Arab (the others were Cheveley Park stud).  

    Even in Ireland, although Coolmore fillied 1st & 3rd spots in the table, M Tabor (1st) was only just over 5 grand ahead of the Aga Khan in prize money.

    While I’m sure that weaker opposition in the UK and stronger opposition in Ireland would send more Coolmore runners over here, I don’t think they could truly take up the slack if the Arab owners left.

    Steve

    #93264
    non vintage
    Member
    • Total Posts 1268

    Of course, they have Big Tits (FR) in France…

    :cheesy:

    #93266
    Lovely Lady
    Member
    • Total Posts 160

    While their horses enhance the British racing scene, unfortunately the names do not.   How many Mujtahids, Mujahid, and Mubtakers can you get  your tongue around in a day.  Also any comparison with Irish Gaelic, or Welsh names is futile, as there are not many of those, the Arabic names are a bombardment, and actually I find it quite inconsiderate and selfish.

    I rather like the 3yo colt, and commentators nightmare,  ‘Imtalkinggibberish’.    Let’s have a few more of those.     I love Simon Holt, but he does make me chuckle over that one.    Quite a good name for a Forum member too !  

    Can anyone think of any others  down the years, similar ? <br>

    (Edited by Lovely Lady at 4:10 pm on May 5, 2004)

    #93268
    runandskip
    Member
    • Total Posts 412

    well at least someone agrees with me;)  if the rest of the maktoum family and abdulla can stretch themselfs to give their horses decent and memorble names im sure hamden could if he tried.<br>AP RACING…. it apears ive upset you again sorry if i have. maybe i should intruduce myself when i see you at the races next but then again best not eh;) <br>guess im just a traditionlist who wants jumping in the winter flat racing in the summer and high class horses with names that will live in the mind forever.

    #93272
    Maurice
    Participant
    • Total Posts 355

    I agree with APRacing. I’d classify the original posting as somewhere between racist and xenophobic.

    British racing history is littered with foreign names. No one ever seemed to object to the likes of Nijinsky, Petite Etoile, Bahram, etc. The objection seems to arise from the greater difficulty in pronouncing the less familiar Arabic words. Nashwan was easy, and Peter O’Sullevan was always at  pains to ensure Unfuwain was pronounced Afwan, but obviously Haafhd is beyond the wit of your average English punter.

    We should be celebrating the emergence of the champion miler elect, and the racing press should be helping us all by giving us a clear guide to the correct pronunciation of foreign names. An indication of their meaning is also helpful in appreciating why they’re so named.

    *Just for those who weren’t sure, the French filly was pronounced p’teet etwal.

    #93273
    hoofski
    Member
    • Total Posts 103

    APracing; you really are starting to sound like a founding member of the thought police. Take a deep breath, calm down and think pleasing thoughts before you hit the "submit" button

    "I’m just sitting watching flowers in the rain"

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