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?National Hunt Races??

Home Forums Horse Racing ?National Hunt Races??

Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 24 total)
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  • #12262
    BUD
    Member
    • Total Posts 98

    Is That what they are called?
    I so Dig them. Stateside we don’t have anything Ive seen remotley similar!

    There is nothing like 20 something horses stampeding down the line all competeting for space that someone eles hols at the moment. Racing hard to the finish.

    What Tracks or season do you fine the majority of these.

    Beside for the Timeform pick how does one handicap this?

    This style race reminds me of a entertaining enigma–Thanks for any answers-Also If I am Asking to many questions, I will slow down the asking–Thanks Mates

    #242188
    The Eye Of Sauron
    Participant
    • Total Posts 148

    Nice fishing.

    Doubt you’ll get a bite mind.

    #242205
    BUD
    Member
    • Total Posts 98

    Nice fishing.

    Doubt you’ll get a bite mind.

    you mean no one will give me any info?

    Well That would be my loss-Wouldn’t it?

    #242209
    Gerald
    Member
    • Total Posts 4293

    Landing after jumping a fence is hard on the ankles, tendons, and the legs in general. Therefore NH is mainly Autumn, Winter, Spring, when the ground is softer.

    With the advent of effective watering, NH racing now occurs during the summer months as well. This is very useful for Worcester, which is often under the River Severn during winter, rather than next to it.

    Virtually all the top horses will have returned from their summer hols a couple of weeks ago. NH racing moves into top gear during October.

    Races are a minimum of 2 miles.

    Hurdles – 8 flights per 2 miles.
    Steeplechases – 12 fences per 2 miles.

    Season roughly runs from start of May to end of April, though horses keep their birthday of 1 January.

    In Britain, it is mainly concentrated in the South-West and West.

    Horses that are 3 for the second half of this year, and 4 for the first half of next year are referred to as Juveniles. They can only compete over hurdles.

    After winning a race, horses can still compete in Novice Hurdles or Novice Chases for the remainder of the season, though usually with a weight penalty.

    Horses can lose their status as novices over either Hurdles or Fences at the end of the season, but still retain it over the other, if they haven’t yet won one of those types.

    Horses running over 3 miles are referred to as Stayers.

    The distance of 2 and a half miles (I’m thinking primarily of Chases) is thought of as specialised, though slightly ignored.

    In the past, jumpers were either rejects from the flat, trying their luck, or Irish store horses bred for it. Nowadays, a lot of top or middle-ranking horses are bought from France, and tend to be quicker maturing.

    As regards handicapping, quite a few people, instead of using ratings, concentrate on what conditions will suit particular horses:-
    Fast, Good ,or Soft Ground
    Undulating or flat track
    galloping or sharp track
    soft or hard fences
    Uphill finish
    left-handed or right-handed track
    a break of 40+ days between races, etc

    If you do want to handicap, a lazy rule-of-thumb is 1 lb per length.

    You wil get lots, and lots, in fact all of it, Irish jump racing on Attheraces.

    Not au fait with their rhythm, but this is what it is like in Britain:-
    The main track is Cheltenham, and is left-handed and undulating, with a stiff finish.
    first big meeting is at Cheltenham 13th, 14th & 15th November, and the feature race is a betting race 2m5f Paddy Power H’cap Chase (used to famously be known as the Mackeson)
    next big meeting is at Newbury 26-28th November and the feature race is the 3m 2f Hennessy Cognac Gold Cup (H’cap Chase).
    On Boxing Day is the King George VI & Queen Elizabeth etc Gold Cup. This is 3m, on a flat, sharp, right-handed track at Kempton (near Heathrow airport). Most people will agree that this race has a higher quality roll (role??) of honor than the Cheltenham Gold Cup.
    By far the most important thing is the Cheltenham Festival, which takes place about the second week of march. This is full of Championship Races, such as the aforementioned Cheltenham Gold Cup (3m2f), Champion Chase (2m) and Champion Hurdle (2m). As this is near St Patrick’s Day (17th March). and St Patrick was British and sent over to civilise the Irish, hordes of Irish come over every year to show their gratitude.
    Just over 3 weeks later, at the start of April is the Aintree Grand National meeting. The Grand National H’cap Chase (4m4f) will for the first time have prize money of £1,000,000

    #242210
    BUD
    Member
    • Total Posts 98

    wont no bother–

    Well on ATR I can’t put a post in and get an answer–This I thought was is a forum—Little to much time on my hand since I was taken down in the line of duty-Live in constant pain besides I can no longer walk–So I use the racing game to forget–to keep my mind busy—

    So I will still play and do what I do–But I will leave you chaps to yourselves without the bother of me asking question—

    Growing up in the service-Then Becoming a (cop)–Before everything happened it was my personality to know what I know 1k times over-One way for me to do that was thru questions–Except there is was life and death–

    No Probs Mates–No More Questions–You can even delete this

    Sorry meant know harm.

    #242211
    Gerald
    Member
    • Total Posts 4293

    Ignore them – they probably haven’t read your other posts.

    There seems to be a lot of scepticism here about who other people are:- whenever anyone says they are a professional gambler, they get met with a torrent of abuse. Myself, I don’t mind, because it doesn’t make any difference to me whether someone else is a professional gambler or not, so I don’t care whether someone is lying or telling the truth.

    Don’t go – this place is becoming more and more like a ghost town.

    Gerald

    #242214
    Gerald
    Member
    • Total Posts 4293

    having to say something rather than nothing.

    Hey! Watch it, that is a little bit too close to home. I’ve made 1678 posts in 8 months, which is 210 per month, which is 7 a day, and that is with me disappearing for two spells.

    :lol:

    #242228
    Drone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5616

    Is That what they are called?
    I so Dig them. Stateside we don’t have anything Ive seen remotley similar!

    There is nothing like 20 something horses stampeding down the line all competeting for space that someone eles hols at the moment. Racing hard to the finish.

    Correct me if I’m wrong but it appears from your post that you may be referring to the Stewards Cup run yesterday at Goodwood. These are

    Flat Racing

    sprints, colloquially known as ‘cavalry charges’.

    The term National Hunt is reserved for

    Jump Racing

    only, the bulk of which is held between October and May. See Gerald’s post.

    Not entirely sure why or when ‘National Hunt’ was chosen as a generic term for jumping, but I’d guess it’s because the pre-eminent jumps meeting – The Cheltenham Festival held in March – was for many decades known as The National Hunt Meeting.

    #242241
    Gerald
    Member
    • Total Posts 4293

    No Drone – Bud’s been watching the Galway Festival this week.

    #242251
    robnorth
    Participant
    • Total Posts 6217

    Not entirely sure why or when ‘National Hunt’ was chosen as a generic term for jumping, but I’d guess it’s because the pre-eminent jumps meeting – The Cheltenham Festival held in March – was for many decades known as The National Hunt Meeting.

    I would imagine it’s because originally jump racing was organised by local hunts. Once an organisation was needed to control the sport nationally then it’s logical that they chose the term ‘National Hunt’.

    Rob

    #242260
    Pompete
    Member
    • Total Posts 2391

    No Probs Mates–No More Questions–You can even delete this

    Hey Bud, don’t be like this – your welcome here. We all started somewhere knowing very little and picking up bits and pieces here and there and there is some helpful people on here to help you out.

    Not me I’m sorry to say as my only advise would be to steer clear of this Irish stuff – enjoy it as it is, watching it, but don’t try working it out or betting on it. 8)

    #242261
    Pompete
    Member
    • Total Posts 2391

    Edit: I don’t know how I did that.

    #242293
    BUD
    Member
    • Total Posts 98

    I have been watching- Sometimes in the middle of Physical Therapy–Happy cracked me up–Yes it may be the American way just to say something,

    A vast amount of American races have 4-6 horses in the race-Its A turn off to me–Now with Del Mar and Saratoga–But they will be done soon–

    The Other is Unfortunatley after the dehabilitating injury-The Shock to my system MS which is in the family line came out—I have several lesions in my brain–They act almost as small strokes- Now the connections dont((always)) connect-Short term memory is a big offender—They may have explained the game on ATR–I may have taken in the info-Then it dissappeared–OK I am making myself look dumb–I am not –I do have some limitations–Unfortunately—Thanks for the support folks-I mean no malice-Just trying to learn-Not trying to think of dumb questions either— :roll: just trying to learn-the With The Meds Injury and MS–Thats a tough task–Truth!!
    Thanks

    #242301
    Gerald
    Member
    • Total Posts 4293

    Glad to have you back Bud.

    The comments last night made me depressed, and I retired to bed unhappy.

    I’d agree with Pompete, about Irish jump racing being hard to fathom.

    One thing I didn’t mention are National Hunt Flat Flaces. These are also referred to as Bumpers. These are for horses that haven’t run in proper Flat races. In Britain, horses can only run in a couple or so of these. In Ireland, I don’t know the maximum number.

    Also, a number of horses graduate from Point-to-Points – this applies to Ireland, more than Britain. These tend to be 3m races, and the fences are a little smaller than steeplechase fences. Point-to-Points are organised by local Hunts. Although Foxhunting (or more accurately, hunting with dogs) has recently been banned in Britain, the Hunts still exist as organisations.

    Later in the season, after 1 February, I think, horses that have been hunting are allowed to compete in Hunter Chases, that are held at the proper National Hunt racecourses.

    #242350
    bbobbell
    Member
    • Total Posts 591

    Is That what they are called?
    I so Dig them. Stateside we don’t have anything Ive seen remotley similar!

    There is nothing like 20 something horses stampeding down the line all competeting for space that someone eles hols at the moment. Racing hard to the finish.

    Correct me if I’m wrong but it appears from your post that you may be referring to the Stewards Cup run yesterday at Goodwood. These are

    Flat Racing

    sprints, colloquially known as ‘cavalry charges’.

    The term National Hunt is reserved for

    Jump Racing

    only, the bulk of which is held between October and May. See Gerald’s post.

    Not entirely sure why or when ‘National Hunt’ was chosen as a generic term for jumping, but I’d guess it’s because the pre-eminent jumps meeting – The Cheltenham Festival held in March – was for many decades known as The National Hunt Meeting.

    We get the term National Hunt racing from the original title of the National Hunt Steeplechase which was first run in 1866 and was, in its earliest years, itinerant but settled at Cheltenham in 1911. Hence the term National Hunt Meeting or the National Hunt Festival.

    The race was originally called the Grand National Hunt Steeplechase. It was the first attempt at providing an organised set of rules for our wonderful sport. The organising committee was made up of representatives of the most prominent hunts of the time, many still in existence to day. For instance there was a Mr Fernie, Lord Belvoir, the Duke of Beaufort and other prominent MFHs. The National Hunt Committee finally merged with the Jockey Club in 1969. John Lawrence and John Welcome wrote "The History of Steeplechasing" in 1966 to celebrate the National Hunt centenary.

    Hope that is of interest Bud and Drone. Bud if you want the real essence of National Hunt racing try the country tracks like Kelso, Towcester, Market Rasen, Huntingdon and the Bank Holiday delights of Cartmel. It is a wonderful sport in some great settings.

    #242375
    Drone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5616

    Good stuff Bbobb, thanks

    Didn’t realise the two codes had separate governing bodies in the shape of The National Hunt Committee and Jockey Club, and moreover that a merger didn’t take place until as recently as 1969.

    No wonder then that the Duke of Norfolk on being asked if NH should be introduced at Ascot replied "over my dead body"

    The National Hunt/Flat factioning and rivalry is tedious enough nowadays. Back then with them being officially distinct it was probably a microcosm of The Cold War out there in the real world.

    #246174
    Gerald
    Member
    • Total Posts 4293

    Hi Bud

    you’ll probably get racing from Ffos Las tomorrow, as it is on ATR.

    Although there have been a few meetings there already, tomorrow is the official opening.

    As you’ve probably guessed from the spelling, it is in (South) Wales.

    Just mentioning this meeting, as there seem to be quite a few runners in a lot of the races – the way you like it. Also, a lot of the top British trainers and jockeys are there.

    The 4.25 (11.25am Eastern Time) is quite an interesting race as it contains a horse that could develop into a serious Grand National contender.

    Gerald

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