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Will Brighton set a record for lowest rated racing

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Viewing 17 posts - 52 through 68 (of 83 total)
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  • #1610123
    Seasider
    Participant
    • Total Posts 759

    “Hethersett 134
    Park Top 131
    Cacoethes 130
    Sodium 128”

    Having failed to locate a copy of his book ‘The Brighton Races’ I contacted author Jim Beavis who kindly sent me this message:

    “A bit below the standard of those four were Operatic Society (seven of his 30 wins were at Brighton) and Dart Board (winner of the 1967 Brighton Derby Trial before finishing third in the English and Irish Derbys).

    Rather higher was the 1879 Brighton Cup winner Isonomy, who won the Ascot Gold Cup, Goodwood Cup, the Gold Vase (a 2m weight for age race at Royal Ascot), the Doncaster Cup and the Ebor in the same year. He won the Cambridgeshire the year before and the Gold Cup a second time a year later and sired two Triple Crown winners.”

    Isonomy now tops the list of Brighton’s best for me. This horse had such a towering reputation that he gets a mention in a Sherlock Holmes story.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isonomy_(horse)

    Thanks, Jim.
    .
    .
    .
    Below is Jim’s website address listing other books written by him, like so:

    The Croydon Races (1999)
    The Brighton Races (2003)
    The History of Fontwell Park (2008)
    The Days of Fontwell (2011)
    The History of Bath Racecourse (2011)
    The History of Uttoxeter Races (2015) (now out of stock)
    The History of Royal Windsor Racecourse (2016)
    The History of Salisbury Racecourse (2019) (£12 plus p&p)
    Ffos Las: The Birth of a Racecourse (£8 plus p&p)

    My Books

    #1610153
    Gladiateur
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    • Total Posts 2725

    Excellent work, Seasider. I’ll have to look up Jim’s books.

    #1610159
    Ravel
    Participant
    • Total Posts 86

    Jim here. Glad to be of service. I posted a few times on TRF many, many years ago and stopped when I didn’t have anything interesting to add.

    One of the minority-interest subjects I am working on is that of old race names and where they came from. Things like the Temple Stakes – which temple? Today there are Sweet Solera and Rose of Lancaster Stakes- who were they? They tend to disappear over time and I thought it would be nice to help preserve them somewhere other than in dusty old books of results.

    Taking 1982 as my base at random, I am working through about 800 race names, having excluded local villages and sponsors from the list. Just a few paragraphs on each one is my aim, and it’s taking a long time! I will probably put it online eventually in the style of Jockeypedia. If anyone fancies chipping in, please let me know. The more obscure the information, the better.

    #1610161
    Cork All Star
    Participant
    • Total Posts 3956

    Isn’t the Rose of Lancaster just named after the Red Rose symbol of the county?

    #1610162
    IanDavies
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    • Total Posts 5644

    Been going racing at Beverley since 1977 and this prompted me to google who Hilary Needler was!

    https://www.thefreelibrary.com/Beverley+mourns+death+of+Hilary+Needler.-a0287191696

    Sir Cherryade of Hampshire
    ("Chezza" to the proletariat)
    Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/Ian_Davies_
    https://www.facebook.com/ThePointtoPointNHandFlatracingpunter/

    #1610165
    Drone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5704

    An interesting area of research Jim, enjoy

    Sweet Solera won the 1000 Guineas and Oaks in 1961. I think ‘solera’ is just a portmanteau construction derived from the grandsire’s and sire’s names: Solferino (a town in Italy) and Solonoway

    #1610168
    Ravel
    Participant
    • Total Posts 86

    Cork All Star – yes. Not a barmaid in a Lancaster pub.
    Ian – thanks, I haven’t got round to Hilary Needler so that’s saved me some time.
    Drone – I knew about the filly but not the portmanteau construction. Thanks.
    Interesting (to us) and dare I say harmless fun.

    #1610169
    Drone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5704

    The red rose of Lancaster originated with John Of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, a son of Edward III, who used it as his heraldic emblem. Appropriately, there’s a John Of Gaunt Stakes, also run at Haydock

    #1610170
    Gladiateur
    Participant
    • Total Posts 2725

    A solera is also part of the sherry-making process. The word itself means “on the ground” in Spanish.

    Looking forward to seeing your results, Jim. Keep posting in here and I’m sure we’ll all help as best we can. 👍

    #1610174
    Cork All Star
    Participant
    • Total Posts 3956

    Solferino was the site of a battle in the 19th century. It might have become just another footnote in military history but for a Swiss businessman named Henri Dunant who was travelling in the area and was shocked by the sight of injured and dying soldiers without any medical attention. He wrote a book suggesting that a humanitarian organisation should be established to provide such care. It was the start of the Red Cross.

    #1610176
    Cork All Star
    Participant
    • Total Posts 3956

    “There’s a John Of Gaunt Stakes, also run at Haydock.”

    There is also a pub named after him in Lancaster. But I do not know if it has a barmaid named Rose. 😉

    #1610181
    Ravel
    Participant
    • Total Posts 86

    I’m going to have a couple of long paragraphs about today’s two races!
    At the risk of being overbold, could I ask Admin if posts about this subject should go on a separate thread with its own title?

    #1610189
    Drone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5704

    There is also a pub named after him in Lancaster

    I’ve been in there, after visiting the castle. A Tetleys pub, quite small, in the market square if memory serves

    #1610204
    Cork All Star
    Participant
    • Total Posts 3956

    Yes, that is the one. I am sure I had a pint of Tetley Dark Mild when I was last there many years ago, which I assume is no longer brewed.

    Tetley fell into the clutches of Marstons and is now brewed in Burton on Trent rather than Leeds. There used to be a large sign for Joshua Tetley beer on the approach to Leeds station.

    #1610251
    Seasider
    Participant
    • Total Posts 759

    When Favonius (1871) and Isonomy (1879) won the Brighton Cup the race distance was 2m.

    I’m curious to know what route a 2m contest would have taken back then. The course would certainly have occupied more acreage thus offering more scope for distance races.

    Many thanks.

    #1610262
    Ravel
    Participant
    • Total Posts 86

    Brighton’s 2m course ran south from the 1m4f start towards the coast. This is the best illustration I can give you off hand; you’ll have to zoom in though.
    https://www.etsy.com/ca/listing/475305356/1873-map-scan-brighton-sussex-england-uk

    On the northern side of the course you’ll see a loop on the inside at around 7f out. They used to have 1m6f races starting near the winning post, running away from the stands to go round that loop and then come back the conventional way.

    #1610267
    Seasider
    Participant
    • Total Posts 759

    Thanks, Ravel.

    This snippet comes from James Gill’s book on racecourses:

    “They say that, once upon a time, the course was two miles long, but it was shortened because thoroughbreds were being lost over the anfractuous rocks.”

    I learn that anfractuous means ‘full of windings and intricate turnings’. I can’t believe that racehorses ran off the course and disappeared over some rocks, unless you advise me otherwise.

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