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Goerge Ward has died

Home Forums Horse Racing Goerge Ward has died

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  • #21620
    betlarge
    Participant
    • Total Posts 2789

    Sadly George Ward, self-made Anglo-Indian immigrant and a mass sponsor of Flat and partcularly National Hunt racing has just died aged 79.

    Between 1976-1978, he was embroiled in the bitter and prolonged strike at his Grunwick film-processing plant in Willesden, which became a seminal event in British industrial (non!)relations.

    In terms of racing however Ward was a major contibutor.

    Beginning with the Grunwick National Hunt Flat Race series, over 22 years he poured £25 million into race sponsorship; and his Bonusprint, Doubleprint and Tripleprint banners became a feature on many leading British racecourses. Races he sponsored included the Bonusprint King George at Kempton on Boxing Day; the Tripleprint Gold Cup at Cheltenham in December; the Bonusprint Stayers’ Hurdle at the Cheltenham Festival; the Bonusprint Bula Hurdle; the Bonusprint Old Roan Chase; and Haydock’s Bonusprint Champion Hurdle. In addition Ward sponsored the All Weather Championships at the Arena all weather tracks and numerous charity events.

    I also remember him stepping in at the last moment to cover a couple of sponsorships when the incumbents had pulled out.

    Apparently, the slightly-chubby George "always wanted to be a jockey"!

    Mike

    #402077
    Purwell
    Participant
    • Total Posts 814

    Shame that he did not think as much of his employees as he did his racing, will not be missed by me.

    #402080
    Bachelors Hall
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1598

    Shame that he did not think as much of his employees as he did his racing, will not be missed by me.

    This.

    I find it hard to mourn the passing of man who became immensely rich through the crass exploitation of other human beings. He was barely a few rungs up from being a slave owner. Not that he would have given the slightest sh­it.

    #402081
    Eclipse First
    Member
    • Total Posts 1569

    I’m sure horse racing would welcome direct sponsorship from tobacco firms if it had not been made illegal. The constant inter-mingling with nefarious practices and individuals that racing history is indelibly etched means that there is a large proportion of the population that will always regard it with the utmost scepticism.

    #402082
    GeorgeJ
    Participant
    • Total Posts 182

    BH

    That is one way of looking at it. Another is that he provided jobs for people who would otherwise not have had any.

    #402086
    Bachelors Hall
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1598

    BH

    That is one way of looking at it. Another is that he provided jobs for people who would otherwise not have had any.

    Indeed that is another way of looking at it, albeit a highly sanctimonious one. Victorian workhouses also provided jobs for those who would otherwise not have had any but were they justified?

    #402087
    Bachelors Hall
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1598

    *duplicate post*

    #402088
    Purwell
    Participant
    • Total Posts 814

    From Wikipedia:
    " Baroness Williams described it as employing "a great many Asian women on fairly long hours and pretty low wages" – the average pay at Grunwick was £28/week while the average national wage was £72/week and the average full time wage for a female manual worker in London was £44/week.[6](3:16)[14] Overtime was compulsory and often no prior notice would be given. Of the company’s 440 employees, 80% were of Asian origin and 10% of Afro-Caribbean origin, and application forms for employment at Grunwick asked for passport numbers and "date of arrival in the UK."[12][15][16] The MP for Brent South, Laurence Pavitt, said that in his dealings with the company over "many years" prior to the dispute, the management had been rude and intransigent, failing to respond to his letters, and treated the workers in a "deplorable fashion."[17]"

    This might explain to those too young to remember the dispute what it was about.

    #402089
    betlarge
    Participant
    • Total Posts 2789

    Well, The Guardian broke the news of the "appalling" conditions at Grunwick but was forced to subsequently issue this apology:

    In a caption on this gallery we wrongly stated that, at the time of the 1976-78 strike, conditions at Grunwick Processing Ltd were "appalling". We also stated that "the pay was poor, employees had to put their hands up if they wanted to use the toilet, and overtime was compulsory". In fact, as the 1977 Scarman inquiry concluded, physical working conditions in the company before the strike were good; although the rates of pay were low prior to the strike, the company increased financial benefits paid to workers in November 1976 and April 1977 so that at the time of his report Lord Scarman noted that the rates of pay were broadly comparable with, and in some respects, slightly better than, those paid by comparable firms in the industry; it was not necessary to seek permission to go to the toilet after the company moved premises in 1976; and employees understood and accepted the requirement of compulsory overtime during busy periods. We apologise to Grunwick and its chairman, George Ward.

    I should point out that this dispute was some 15 years prior to when racing took the bulk of Ward’s sponsorships i.e. 1990 onwards.

    However, there was certainly a lot of ‘noise’ surrounding Ward in his early days and I would still bet he engaged in some form of dubious employment practice at the time.

    Mike

    #402101
    KINGFISHER
    Member
    • Total Posts 1508

    I cant fault George Wards contributions to Racing,he saw it as a platform for huge pulicity for his printing businesses at a time Photography was huge,particularly the 35mm format besides I liked his Grey horse

    Padre Pio

    ,useful sprinter! He may well have been a ‘Slave Driver’ but that philosophy was rife in Horse racing at the time too……..Still is when you dig a bit! :shock:

    #402190
    Kenh
    Participant
    • Total Posts 739

    BH

    That is one way of looking at it. Another is that he provided jobs for people who would otherwise not have had any.

    Of course that is good old thatcheresque thinking, ‘think yourself lucky you’re being exploited’. Thank god there are laws in place protecting people for Trade Union membership and providing certain conditions are met making companies recognise Trade Unions.

    Of course it does expand the whole moral debate in racing whereby we praise the likes of Khalid Abdulla for the money he puts into the sport even though he is a representative of one of the most repressive nations on earth.

    I don’t want to see anyone die but, people do and I won’t be mourning George Wards passing.

    #402222
    DaveMonk
    Member
    • Total Posts 153

    Is that the fella who used to have the Aidensfield Arms :roll:

    #402224
    Bachelors Hall
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1598

    One could say there’s a sliding scale of repute amongst racehorse owners.

    As mentioned, the house of Saud is particularly unsavoury and I felt very uneasy when Caspar Netscher won on Saturday. Moving to the jumps, it’s a badly kept secret that Michael O’Leary is a good and proper toerag and currency speculators (JP McManus) are parasitic in their very nature. But you get the feeling that McManus cares a lot more for the spirit of the sport than Bottom-line O’Leary. Conversely, Trevor Hemmings is generally regarded as a comparatively good egg so I guess it depends on where one wants to draw the line (assuming one has a line at all).

    #402229
    insomniac
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1453

    Much of the mud thrown at Ward and others on this thread is probably well deserved. It touches on the basic question though of "what business is it of Horse Racing how an owner earns his money?"

    A fair percentage of people wealthy enough to afford to own a string of racehorses probably got their wealth by means which many on here would consider unfair or by exploitation of others.
    Take the Joels and the Oppenheimers; did they exploit South African mine workers to acquire their wealth?
    Who has the right to say, we don’t like your kind or how you got your dosh, clear off! Only the trainer I suppose.

    #402242
    Marginal Value
    Participant
    • Total Posts 686

    Of course that is good old thatcheresque thinking, ‘think yourself lucky you’re being exploited’. Thank god there are laws in place protecting people for Trade Union membership and providing certain conditions are met making companies recognise Trade Unions.

    Of course it does expand the whole moral debate in racing whereby we praise the likes of Khalid Abdulla for the money he puts into the sport even though he is a representative of one of the most repressive nations on earth.

    I don’t want to see anyone die but, people do and I won’t be mourning George Wards passing.

    Since you invoked God and talked about a moral debate, I thought you might have mentioned about Khalid Abdullah being a citizen of one of the most devoutly religious and overtly moral countries in the world. Especially comparing it to the lack of morals and religious belief in the modern UK. "Let he who is without sin cast the first stone". I wonder which repressive regime you might have been referring to, and what representative role Khalid Abdullah has within it. I hope you are not referring to the EU and its repressive and undemocratic forcing of financial policies upon Greece (leading to unemployment, reduced wages, reduced pensions, reduced education and health provision), against the will of its people. I know that Khalid Abdullah’s many trading companies, based in the EU, have extensive influence in the financial world, but I did not know that he, personally, represented any or all of the countries within it. Thanks for the heads up.

    #402248
    Bachelors Hall
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1598

    Of course that is good old thatcheresque thinking, ‘think yourself lucky you’re being exploited’. Thank god there are laws in place protecting people for Trade Union membership and providing certain conditions are met making companies recognise Trade Unions.

    Of course it does expand the whole moral debate in racing whereby we praise the likes of Khalid Abdulla for the money he puts into the sport even though he is a representative of one of the most repressive nations on earth.

    I don’t want to see anyone die but, people do and I won’t be mourning George Wards passing.

    Since you invoked God and talked about a moral debate, I thought you might have mentioned about Khalid Abdullah being a citizen of one of the most devoutly religious and overtly moral countries in the world. Especially comparing it to the lack of morals and religious belief in the modern UK. "Let he who is without sin cast the first stone". I wonder which repressive regime you might have been referring to, and what representative role Khalid Abdullah has within it. I hope you are not referring to the EU and its repressive and undemocratic forcing of financial policies upon Greece (leading to unemployment, reduced wages, reduced pensions, reduced education and health provision), against the will of its people. I know that Khalid Abdullah’s many trading companies, based in the EU, have extensive influence in the financial world, but I did not know that he, personally, represented any or all of the countries within it. Thanks for the heads up.

    What on earth did I just read???

    I don’t even…

    :|

    #402296
    ivanjica
    Participant
    • Total Posts 817

    One could say there’s a sliding scale of repute amongst racehorse owners.

    As mentioned, the house of Saud is particularly unsavoury and I felt very uneasy when Caspar Netscher won on Saturday. Moving to the jumps, it’s a badly kept secret that Michael O’Leary is a good and proper toerag and currency speculators (JP McManus) are parasitic in their very nature. But you get the feeling that McManus cares a lot more for the spirit of the sport than Bottom-line O’Leary. Conversely, Trevor Hemmings is generally regarded as a comparatively good egg so I guess it depends on where one wants to draw the line (assuming one has a line at all).

    At this juncture probably worth mentioning

    Ramzan Kadyrov

    , President of Chechnya, with an appalling human rights record, and alleged to have been personally involved in the torture and murder of political opponents. Lovely chap who had horses in training upto 2011 with that lovely man Gary Moore! I seem to remember Gary Moore also trained a number of horses for a certain convicted murderer Norman Jones. Good judge of character then.

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