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Colic – What Exactly Is It?

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  • #967
    FlatSeasonLoverFlatSeasonLover
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    Bit of a newbies question I suppose but if I don’t ask the question I won’t find the answer. I thought Colic was a horse disease that attacked the hooves of elderly and injured horses. However I see that Roxan (a 3 year old filly) has died of Colic in the last week. SO what exactly is Colic and how do horses get it?

    Racing Post Article On Passing Of Roxan

    #42729
    Jim JTSJim JTS
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    Other than me try to explain the following link will help you FSL…

    <br>Colic In Horses

    #42730
    Lincoln Duncan
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    Laminitis is the disease that can attack the hooves of any horse, whether elderly, youngerly, fit ot fat.

    #42731
    Sal
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    I think you were probably thinking of laminitis, FSL, which is inflammation of the soft lining in their hooves.

    The short version of Jim’s link is:

    Colic is tummy ache for horses, but because they have so much intestine it can be very dangerous.  It is not contagious, it usually comes from eating bad food, drinking too quickly after eating, excising on a full stomach – pretty much like indigestion.

    If caught early enough it is usually easy to treat (coca cola and paracetamol, I think used to be the pony club remedy).  The danger comes when the gut becomes blocked (horses can’t be sick, so bad food has to go the other way).  In addition they can get very distressed with the pain, and in thrashing around to ease it they can damage themselves more.  

    I’m sorry to see about Roxan, I thought she was a really nice type when winning the Hilary Needler.

    #42732
    FlatSeasonLoverFlatSeasonLover
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    Yes Sal thats what I was thinking of :)

    #42733
    Adrian
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    Another cause can be a sudden change in diet – that is why new types of feed need to be introduced slowly.

    I also think it can be stress induced – certainly one of my horses got it when left in his stable all day when he was a young horse used to being out doors.  

    Some recover with time and others with a drench.  Mine had to have an operation whereby they cut a length of his intestine away.   This is the most hazardous way of treating him but it worked fine and we’ve never had a problem since (although often insurance companies won’t cover you for colic more than once).

    #42734
    FlatSeasonLoverFlatSeasonLover
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    Going off topic slightly, but what animals can and can’t vomit? I can see why tummy ache is very severe for a horse if it cannot vomit it out.

    #42735
    Meshaheer
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    • Total Posts 486

    I think babies can suffer from colic too. In fact when I have a stomachache I usually call it colic, but that’s probably due to being round horses too much.

    Horses can’t vomit, as far as I know. Lucky creatures! Then again it’s probably a good thing considering the size of them, although it would probably make stomach ailments less serious if they could.

    #42736
    DroneDrone
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    Quote: from FlatSeasonLover on 4:21 pm on Mar. 6, 2007[br]Going off topic slightly, but what animals can and can’t vomit? <br>

    As a rough rule herbivores (cattle, horses, rabbits) do not vomit or only do so as a ‘last resort’ when very seriously ill; carnivores (cats, dogs) frequently, and often deliberately, by consuming a ‘foreign’ food such as grass; and omnivores (us, pigs) only when having a stomach upset.

    Ruminant herbivores practice a controlled vomiting of sorts when chewing the cud (ruminating).

    I would guess that horses, being non-ruminant herbivores, don’t vomit for the same physiological reasons that allows them to breathe only through their nose and not their mouth i.e. they can’t pant.

    I believe birds don’t chunder either.

    #42737
    Malc Smith
    Member
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    Owls do vomit because, as we know, they bring up pellets.  Also some birds regurgitate their food for their young to eat in a sort of reheating cum MagiMix sort of way.

    Whales are reputed to have swallowed, and later vomited, biblical characters but this could just be a tall tale or a mistranslation when Jonah said he’d been to Wales for three days.

    #42738
    DroneDrone
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    Point taken re: pellets/regurgitation but shouldn’t the word ‘vomit’ be limited to the involuntary ejection of undigested stomach contents due to nausea/infection rather than the voluntary, controlled ejection of waste material/food as part of the natural cycle

    Splitting hairs perhaps.

    Jonah had a weakness for Double Dragon.

    #42739
    racinggirlukracinggirluk
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    There are a few different types of colic…<br>But I will be here forever trying to type it all out for you…My own horse died of impaction colic 3 years ago…He was a very good horse on the flat and was just learning his trade over jumps…<br>here is a page of all the info you need:  http://www.equusite.com/articles/health/healthColicFacts.shtml

    Any questions just ask…

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