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slipstreaming/drafting in the Sussex Stakes and other races

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  • #19265
    kasparovkasparov
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    • Total Posts 660

    Is there any science on how much a horse benefits from another’s slipstream?

    I think it’s a topical issue as it is likely that Canford Cliffs will benefit significantly today by running in Frankel’s slipstream.

    How many lengths will this be worth?

    #366205
    robert99robert99
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    Is there any science on how much a horse benefits from another’s slipstream?

    I think it’s a topical issue as it is likely that Canford Cliffs will benefit significantly today by running in Frankel’s slipstream.

    How many lengths will this be worth?

    Yes, this is well established in modern analysis.
    However before the event it can only be a rough estimate of the bounds of what might happen, as the effect depends on so many factors such as race pace, wind direction and speed, distance behind the covering horse/s etc.

    In a 4 runner race, with CC drifting out at the finish, the form and such analysis is pretty worthless.

    #366248
    kasparovkasparov
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    • Total Posts 660

    Thanks for responding. I know it’s a difficult thing to get exactly right, but I would be interested in orders of magnitude. Presumably Canford Cliffs did benefit a bit from being in Frankel’s slipstream for more than half the race, even though Frankel won anyway.

    I don’t get the impression BHA handicappers make much of an adjustment for slipstream effects so I guess we are talking about a total effect over most races of less than a length.

    #366251
    SteeplechasingSteeplechasing
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    • Total Posts 5767

    A very interesting subject. I don’t know if comparisons with cyclists are at all valid (see article extract below). They might not be as a good bicycle is designed to minimise drag whereas a horse is a horse.

    Streamlining in general would make a fascinating study. I read recently that 80% of a cyclist’s energy output is expended on displacing air.

    If the same applies to horse and rider then the lower a jock can get in the saddle without losing his drive effect, the better. What of horses who race with outsretched neck? Not only are they probably reducing drag but are also breathing more effectively

    Drafting

    Drafting is an important technique in road racing. Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty explained, "The bicyclist, as he moves through the air, produces a turbulent wake behind himself. It makes vortices. The vortices actually make a low pressure area behind the bicyclist and an area of wind that moves along with the bicyclist. If you’re a following a bicyclist and can move into the wind behind the front bicyclist, you can gain an advantage. The low pressure moves you forward and the eddies push you forward."

    The Exploratorium’s Paul Doherty talks about drafting.

    Suprisingly drafting not only helps the bicyclist following the leader, but the lead cyclist gains an advantage as well. Paul explained, "The interesting thing is by filling in her eddy you improve the front person’s performance as well. So two people who are drafting can put out less energy than two individuals (who are not drafting) would covering the same distance in the same time." While the lead cyclist gains some advantage in this situation she still needs to expend much more energy than the cyclist who is following.

    In road racing, bicyclists group together in a pack known as the "peloton" or a pace line called an "echelon." Cyclists who are part of the group can save up to 40 percent in energy expeditures over a cyclist who is not drafting with the group. To be effective drafting, a cyclist needs to be as close as possible to the bicycle in front of him. Many professional cyclists get within inches of the the bicycle in front of them. The shorter the distance the larger the decrease in wind resistance.

    Full article here http://www.exploratorium.edu/cycling/aerodynamics2.html

    Never argue with a fool. He will drag you down to his level and beat you with experience, then onlookers might not be able to tell the difference. https://lazybet.com/

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