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Riding on the roads

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #4681
    lekha85
    Participant
    • Total Posts 330

    I didn’t think this warranted a place on the main forum but if anyone thinks otherwise please let me know.

    I would like to ask all of you to consider signing an online petition against a move by the government to ban horses from riding two abreast on the roads.
    This is a ludicrous attempt which would only serve to make roads more dangerous for horses and drivers. I am fully in support of horses going in single file on narrow, country roads but riding 2 abreast is a safety aspect, not a social one as many people seem to think.
    Riding two abreast allows younger and novice horses and riders to be shielded from the traffic while their confidence is given time to grow. If these horses and riders were totally exposed to lorries, buses and motorbikes without the support of another horse and rider the consequences do not bear thinking about for horse, rider and vehicle driver.
    Riding side by side also encourages less thoughtful drivers to slow down when they would otherwise come flying past. It also means that the distance that drivers have to pull out for is reduced from maybe 12/14 horses to only 6/7.
    Roadwork is an essential part of training for many horses, both those in racing and in other equestrian disciplines, and it is intrinsic that it is done in a way that causes minimal risk to other road users.

    Please, please think about this seriously and I hope you will see the need to sign the petition opposing this ban.

    It can be found at http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/Horseriding/

    Thanks
    Lekha
    x

    #108546
    heffo
    Member
    • Total Posts 319

    I’ll sign your petition lekha. Read about the move in today’s RP. Why are they introducing it? The problem with two horses riding abreast escapes me. Medlers!!!! :x

    #108557
    Kingston Town
    Member
    • Total Posts 1049

    I’m signing it too! Get the cars off the road I say (well except mine that is… :lol: )

    #108566
    Small Bear
    Member
    • Total Posts 52

    are they doing this to bring it into line with the rules for bikes? If so….have they not considered the fact the bikes are inanimate objects driven and controlled solely by the rider….this is certainly not the case with a horse and i agree….could just end up with carnage!! I agree totally!!

    Although…at least tey aren’t asking you to do this as well!

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/6902309.stm

    #108574
    Kotkijet
    Member
    • Total Posts 226

    I have signed it. Not that I want to appease you horsey types but because I HATE cars so much that I would have both Cher and Barbara Streisand sing at my bedside every night for a year just to rid our cities of these eyesores.

    On another note, are there any rules against leaving horse droppings on the roads? If there’s not then I’m going to create a petition to make it legal, nay, encouragable to let your dog poo wherever it wants.

    #108591
    Irish Stamp
    Member
    • Total Posts 3181

    Any chance we could ban white vans from country roads? They’re the real problem, honking horns and driving about 3ft behind you. :twisted:

    #108593
    Andrew Hughes
    Member
    • Total Posts 1904

    White vans are lots of fun, likewise salespeople and business types in BMWs who’s meetings are always a lot more important than yours. I find slowing down to a sensible 5mph within the speed limit really gives them time to ponder on life’s wonder and their own inadequacies. The closer they get to my rear bumper, the slower I go. Its remarkably therapeutic.

    #108595
    Andrew Hughes
    Member
    • Total Posts 1904

    B umper is an expletive? Rather altered the tone of my post.

    #108599
    robnorth
    Participant
    • Total Posts 4712

    Aranalde

    I got the same problem when I used the word to refer to NH Flat races!

    Rob

    #108600
    Andrew Hughes
    Member
    • Total Posts 1904

    Rob

    I think in that context it could be considered an expletive

    #108608
    heffo
    Member
    • Total Posts 319

    Rob

    I think in that context it could be considered an expletive

    Oh Aranadle….you cad!!!! :lol: :lol:

    #108744
    Shadow Leader
    Member
    • Total Posts 763

    Apologies – having posted about this in a couple of other places I am going to shamelessly cut & paste what I put elsewhere! :D

    The sad fact is that half the time riding two abreast is a necessity for the sole purpose of slowing down the traffic and/or being seen by the traffic as well as other reasons.

    Firstly and most importantly it ensures visibility for approaching traffic – it isn’t rare for someone to not notice a lone horse tucked into the side of the road, especially if there is a slight curve in the road and the horse happens to be caught in a kink which effectively hides it for a second or two from the traffic, or in poor light, or rain, or there are high hedges and/or heavily wooded areas surrounding the road where shadows are created that can conceal.

    There is also that seeing two horses abreast, thus taking up at least half of that side of the road, does act as an effective tool to slow down those drivers who would otherwise (especially on seeing a clear road ahead) merely edge over a bit but still go past at a substantial speed – this is unfortunately too common.

    If a horse can be slightly nervous, neurotic or unpredictable, especially in traffic, it is also useful to ride two abreast so that a quiet horse can be placed alongside the nervy one on its outside, thus effectively shielding it from the traffic.

    As a few trainers have also pointed out, in riding two abreast you can also halve the length of a string so making it easier and quicker for drivers to overtake.

    Mind you, the many ignorant riders out there who don’t thank traffic for slowing down don’t help matters for horses in the slightest. They give riders a bad name for something which is inexcusable really – it costs nothing to use a few manners & thank someone. Even when riding a highly strung horse who may be messing about making it hard to take a hand from the reins, a nod of the head is the very least that should be expected.

    Although while they’re at it, if they must keep the cycling brigade happy by banning horses from cycle paths it is only right that they ban bicycles from bridle paths. Not least as half of them are so ignorant when going past horses – not as much as the dog walkers though; the ones who let their dogs run around the horses’ feet and bark at them yet dish out filthy looks and muttering if a horse dares to kick out at or jump around near their little pooch.

    #108752
    dave jay
    Member
    • Total Posts 3386

    I don’t mind them walking two abreast, so long as the riders aren’t smoking. If horses shut off the whole road then it saves people trying to ‘just nip around’ them.

    #108867
    hoofhearted
    Member
    • Total Posts 248

    I fully support the Original Poster’s antipathy towards the new proposed legislation, and have duly signed the petition.

    But, in my ignorance, could I posit a couple of questions to those of you more informed on this subject than I:
    1) Why, in the interest of safety, is the wearing of helmets by riders on public roads not compulsory ? (AFAIK, only children under 14 years are legally obliged to wear a helmet)

    2) Why are high-visibility garments for riders not obligatory. Also, would not the enforced use of fluorescent/reflective bands for horses be a positive influence in reducing the estimated 3,000 road accidents per year involving horses. Lights designed to be attached to stirrups are available ……. but when did you last see anyone using them?

    Would horses be safer travelling on the right-hand side of the road (facing oncoming traffic) as is recommended for pedestrians and dog-walkers. This sounds stupid, but is a genuine query.

    And finally — and this sounds particularly stupid — but why is it considered that “Roadwork is an essential part of training for many horses, both those in racing and in other equestrian disciplines” , other than to reach bridlepaths etc?

    #108886
    lekha85
    Participant
    • Total Posts 330

    I fully support the Original Poster’s antipathy towards the new proposed legislation, and have duly signed the petition.

    But, in my ignorance, could I posit a couple of questions to those of you more informed on this subject than I:
    1) Why, in the interest of safety, is the wearing of helmets by riders on public roads not compulsory ? (AFAIK, only children under 14 years are legally obliged to wear a helmet)

    2) Why are high-visibility garments for riders not obligatory. Also, would not the enforced use of fluorescent/reflective bands for horses be a positive influence in reducing the estimated 3,000 road accidents per year involving horses. Lights designed to be attached to stirrups are available ……. but when did you last see anyone using them?

    Would horses be safer travelling on the right-hand side of the road (facing oncoming traffic) as is recommended for pedestrians and dog-walkers. This sounds stupid, but is a genuine query.

    And finally — and this sounds particularly stupid — but why is it considered that “Roadwork is an essential part of training for many horses, both those in racing and in other equestrian disciplines” , other than to reach bridlepaths etc?

    To your points about hats and reflective gear I agree entirely and I wuld whole-heartedly support any move to make them compulsory for all riders on the roads.

    Not so sure whether riding on the right would help. If a car had to stop to let another one on the other side of the road pass before it pulled out then the horses would keep moving towards the stopped car and could cause all sorts of problems. Much easier to be moving in the same direction as the traffic.

    Roadwork is essential firstly from the point of view of getting to gallops, bridlepaths, schooling fields etc. Not all yards have their gallops right behind the stables unfortunately (if only!!). We have to ride on the road for about 15/20 mins to reach our gallops…
    Also, roadwork serves to strengthen a horse’s tendons through walking on the hard surface for a sustained period of time. This can reduce the risk of tendon injury when a horse reaches the racecourse and ultimately is a positive step towards ensuring the horse’s welfare.

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