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Elite thoroughbred gene can be identified

Home Forums Horse Racing Elite thoroughbred gene can be identified

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  • #19215
    davidbrady
    Member
    • Total Posts 3901
    #365181
    davidbrady
    Member
    • Total Posts 3901

    Equinome Ltd website

    #365234
    Onthesteal
    Member
    • Total Posts 1387

    The holy grail?

    They claim to have the ability to identify which horses have the greatest genetic potential, but this [presumably accurate] knowledge definitely does not have the potential to take ‘the fun’ out of the game… At best, it’d make the divide even wider.

    Can you imagine Godolphin or any other megabucks buyer ever turning down an impeccably bred horse on the strength of this? Ot the same connections investing in something with an inferior bloodline or looks to another animal for the same reason? It’ll be interesting to see how this goes…

    #365249
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    • Total Posts 17722

    Bit of a silly season feature, in my opinion.

    Quote from scientist, fresh from a three year research program, Dr Emmeline Hill:

    "We can identify the genes contributing to Elite performances amongst thoroughbreds"

    .

    Which prompts the question of what criteria they were using to identify this "Elite" quality. Well, according to the scientist’s account they worked from samples taken from "almost 400 horses, thoroughbreds" of which they categorised half as "Elite" on the grounds that they’d "won at the top level" (flat or jumps not specified, or definition of "top level"). The other half had never won a race.

    They then collated which of the 21,000 possible genes those "Elite" horses had in common…

    eh, voila!

    A foolproof recipe for the super horse. I don’t know whether they also isolated the "crap" genes which were responsible for the slowboats and donkeys.

    Any A-level Maths with Stats student could tell them that this sample could not be statistically significant, given the huge random possibilities of this gene pool, and that the criterion of "Elite" they’d chosen was random. They didn’t examine the physiognomy of the animals, and Mendelian "regression to the norm" doesn’t seem to have entered their calculations either.

    This looks on the face of it like bad science, worse stats – and ultimately yet another piece of gravy train genetics done off the back of some skewed research. It is surely completely meaningless for a breeding industry based on years of practical experience of what might work and what probably won’t.

    Good luck to these poor scientists in touting round their spin-off commercial venture: I’d guess that Coolmore and Godolphin won’t be signing up soon.

    #365332
    andyod
    Member
    • Total Posts 4012

    Yes indeed and I believe they work at that bastion of elitism Trinity College Dublin.They surely would recognise elitism.

    #365338
    davidbrady
    Member
    • Total Posts 3901

    They work in UCD, not Trinity.

    Jim Bolger is one of the directors.

    #365342
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    • Total Posts 17722

    They work in UCD, not Trinity. Jim Bolger is one of the directors.

    Interesting, David – there was no mention of his commercial involvement with the consultancy venture, but that would make sense. Times are hard for trainers…

    #365354
    andyod
    Member
    • Total Posts 4012

    If I had known that Bolger waas involved I would have guessed Galway in the Gaeltoch.

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