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Sunday field sizes

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  • #2619
    Glenn
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1981

    I see 15 runner maximum fields have been imposed left and right tommorow on the grounds of ‘health and safety’.

    With 14 runner races schedueled at 7 minute intervals for morning, noon and night from next January, you have to ask: just how much more abuse are punters gonna take before they finally walk away from the sport.

    #71141
    gamble
    Participant
    • Total Posts 2728

    <br> Keep up the big eye Glenn<br> I believe one day (along with myself :biggrin:)<br> you will be knighted by the Nappy boys.<br> Betfair should crown you too,<br> and having been a double agent means<br> you just have to write a book.

    The loss of the sport is not seven seconds away,<br> but those gangly horses that never sleep<br> are looking mighty virtual these days<br> and much like the murdering Indian elephants<br> could soon kick in the crud<br> of the third class trained beasts.

    Pin ball wizard has taken over<br> and as they say<br> he never misses a trick.

    flatcapgamble :bore:

     

    #71143
    gamble
    Participant
    • Total Posts 2728

    Probably shouldn’t have mentioned<br> the double agent reference Glenn<br> but you get far too easier a ride these days<br> and my mouth is naturally uncontrollable

    As for racing and its sudden<br> decline into pin ball<br> I have even noticed a bit of dumming down<br> of ye grand ol’ National.

    The fences are softer<br> but where are those friday night preview menace shows<br> that got the blood up.<br> Where’s the bubble gone ?

    As for the staple fifteen<br> that harnesses the lowly classed repetitive bilge<br> it’s just a manipulated disgrace !<br> and plays into the hands<br> of the new rising force of football<br> which has been very skilfully marketed<br> by clever shots and the new <br> chess piece playing managers<br>

    #71144
    Glenn
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1981

    Gamble,

    I raise my glass to you,<br>Filled with ice cold seize cent soixante quatre,<br>Others around here may also raise their glasses too,<br>But I fear they’re filled with blood

    #71145
    gamble
    Participant
    • Total Posts 2728

    Glenn<br> I shall be singing the ten green bottles song<br> as I march through the gates of hell for a hot totty dicussion<br> with the horned brewmaster.

    Dont forget to pack your each way books<br> when you take your hols.<br> I’ve seen many reading them on planes<br> and they are strangley gaining popularity as the market <br> declines – just like little planet as the birds threaten <br> to flu the beaches

    #71146
    gamble
    Participant
    • Total Posts 2728

    The darkknight,<br> <br> I had difficulty with your double kk this morning after a night of ritualistic excess, but thank you heartily for your acquiescense to my grasshopper referenced bootiful mind extractions. Glenn needs the paludit more than I, as he champions the cuase of the disappearing band of each way thieves who are now forced, like me to rummage through the bargain shelves of Tesco for some replacement carry away value.

     I am sitting here underpanted in a green towelling robe on my first sunday pot of tea. Everything is extremely quiet which is one thing I so like about the dragging Sunday effect. Everything is in its place – even the frozen organic 30% off thieved  fowl that takes pride of place in my freezer just waiting for next munchy sunday when I usuallly salute the lord before donning a bib to get stuck in with a devil’s smile.

     My Grand National allowance runs out today so I will once again take a back seat in this house of experts. The National is still the polished jewel in the crown and manages to bring out the boy in me, quite accurately providing the odd spot to a tired :old: red ginger face.

    As my mind flickered to sleep, bottles not cans strewed the other room – as National weekend is lived in style, I just wondered about the length of Ross Comm’s nose and the effect on history had it been shorter. Changing the start of the race of giants is the fiasco we should never meddle in – rather like the 16 men of battle who cry when one is lost – their numbers must be replete to fulfill the tradition of fairness, so important in this godforsaken land of grab.

      As for my inclinations this year, I may well sell myself to Betfair in the smartest-minded move of the century. If they refuse me they may well get my skulduggery back on their boards to taunt and possibly re-activate the ticking timebomb flatcappedplan they slightly worried over when they represented a small blue sea rather than an ocean.

    But no, I will go quietly on, I have little or no force to meddle in masterplans, so why delude myself ? The mind is not that powerful to take on real muscle even with the auspicious title of son to the empire.

    Time for another national pot of tea.

    #71147
    clivex
    Member
    • Total Posts 3420

    I am sitting here underpanted in a green towelling robe on my first sunday pot of tea

    A little too much detail…

    #71148
    clivex
    Member
    • Total Posts 3420

    More seriously though…why will people walk away from the sport now over what is, lets face it, a marginal issue rather than before when there was the dreaded 10% tax and margins far worse than today? And we have exchanges too…

    Best time ever for punters i would say

    But i dont bother with ew betting

    #71149
    Glenn
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1981

    I’d say that, relatively speaking, things are worse for horse racing than in the 10% tax days.

    You had 10% tax on soccer bets too and minimum trebles/fivefolds. Oh, and if you fancied a game of poker the casinos would accomodate you if you fancied waiting 48hrs and playing at 3am. Even the margins on the numbers rackets have come down far more than they have on horse racing.

    Just look at what happened to greyhound racing’s popularity when the bookies got their hands on it.

    #71150
    sberry
    Member
    • Total Posts 1801

    i agree with clive, things are only getting better.  Who wants 16 runner fields, it’s just too difficult to pick the winner then isn’t it ?  roll on 7 day a week 4/5 runner races at lingfield and kempton for us win backers and just run the odd big field lottery over fences for the blindfold-pinsticker brigade………hic !

    #71151
    gamble
    Participant
    • Total Posts 2728

    Clivex you dont bother with each way betting<br> so that’s ok then<br> you are protected from manipulation<br> and we can all sleep better.

    Very much like the one man<br> in a communal slipper bath at Strangeways<br> who is underpanted<br> and dares to laugh at the rest  :biggrin:

     

    #2774
    empty wallet
    Member
    • Total Posts 1631

    Does more racing, mean lower field sizes and poor quality racing?

    #73686
    clivex
    Member
    • Total Posts 3420

    Piece in the paper today detailed that next year there will be Sunday racing every weekend bar one and 287 evening fixtures on 178 nights. Must be alot of floodlit stuff

    My view is that if it doesnt affect the racing I enjoy then im not bothered

    But a lot of bookies that i pass in the evenings are pretty well empty (maybe demographics of my locality and the internet of course) and the crowd at kempton was pretty modest last night by all accounts (was horrible hot though…im just up the road), then i do wonder how sustainable some of this is?

    #73687
    Maxilon 5
    Member
    • Total Posts 2432

    Like many factors, racing is affected by the wider economic picture.

    The fixture list is largely driven by a bouyant economy.  The more disposable income a person has, the more racing authorities generate wagering opportunities to get their share.

    And racecourse attendances have seldom been higher. So you could argue that the policy is working, particularly in the summer.

    Making hay while the sun shines, the powers that be will try to maximise profitability when conditions suit them to do so.

    And as there are only so many good horses to go round, so the majority of the expansion opportunities will continue to be contested by low grade animals.

    As punters, we have an advantage over the bookie. There have been whole meetings this summer I haven’t even given more than a cursory glance to, (Tuesdays, for some reason, in particular).

    To sound a warning, though, EW,  I’ll refer to Southwell.

    I would love to see the attendance figures on my regular course. With the exception of ladies night, twilight meetings and some jumping gatherings, the racing is so low quality, so prone to skulldug – oh alright then, weird outcomes – that I swear hard-core attendances have been in steady decline over the last year or so.

    Watching the same mediocre animals beat each other with ironic and monotonous regularity, irrespective of weight pulls, supposedly positive distance changes, and favourable statisitical probabilities wears you down after a while.

    At what point does the racegoer say enough is enough. When is saturation point reached?

    Bookmakers rely on us winning a percentage of races.

    They need us to win. Sometimes. It’s the principle of Intermittent Reinforcement. That a winner is just around the corner. You just don’t know when.  As long as they win on more races, the status quo continues. Life goes on.

    With low class racing at venues like Southwell, Wolverhampton and Catterick, at what point does the "customer" decide that  the largely incomprehensible and unpredictable low grade sport is too much bother.

    It’s easier – and cheaper – to stick a fiver on the Irish Lottery and get lashed in the local.

    And as a society, the decline in the percieved value of learning, ("dumbing down") has been well documented.

    Portman Park, Lucky 49’s, roulette machines and state lotteries are a lot easier to play and a lot less taxing.  It used to be said that horse racing gives you a chance, if you work hard.

    With low grade racing, why bother?  You study like an emeritus professor, work out the likely probabilities, assess the value odds, trawl through the prior stats, come up with a shortlist and then some completely incomprehensible outcome occurs; (the 9.10 at Wolver on Monday night is a case in point).

    And there isn’t a thing a racegoer can do about it. Repeat this process for six races and multiply by the number of low grade meetings you attend and work out the likelihood of doing something else.

    In retrospect, a fiver on the numbers has much the same prospect of a positive outcome as betting on low grade racing.

    The racing authorities know this, but seem unwilling to confront the obvious long term consequences. That bit I don’t understand.  

    Roll on Goodwood.:biggrin:

    Cheers

    Max

    #73688
    Glenn
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1981

    Quote: from Maxilon 5 on 1:09 pm on July 20, 2006[br]The racing authorities know this, but seem unwilling to confront the obvious long term consequences. That bit I don’t understand.  

    Welcome to the brave new world of the levy being linked to bookie profits and not turnover.

    The racing authorities don’t do anything about this because they want you to lose.

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