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Studying Form

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
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  • #20115
    Gooders21
    Member
    • Total Posts 1

    I was wondering if anyone could give me any tips on how to study the form in a quick and efficient manner. I have been following horse racing for the last 6-8 years and am really into it. I have had a certain amount of success using a different variety of selection processes, but I still haven’t found a method that I can use on a regular basis. I like to look at races with around 6 to 12 runners in, and often when studying races like this I find that it is taking me two to three hours just to study one race. When there is a busy Saturday programme this can lead to along time studying. I have read a few books regarding form studying process and alot of the writers suggest spending an hour on a race with this many runners.

    I was wondering if anyone could share there opinions and ideas, on how I could study a race in a quicker and efficient manner.

    Cheers

    #376215
    tbracingtbracing
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1407

    Godders depending on how much time is available to you it may prove best to specialise and try and work to a routine which may improve efficiency in your process.

    It’s important to watch races as much as you can in my opinion so I would suggest getting into a routine of doing so.

    Perhaps you would aim to work only 5/6f handicaps at class 4 upwards on the flat as an example.

    Then in your routine aim to:

    Watch all the races back from the previous day that were at 5 and 6f in handicaps from class 4 upwards, make any relevant notes about the race (specific runners, way race was run, track bias, state of the course etc) and store them accordingly. You could make your own notification spreadsheets or use some the nag me to track any specific runners you feel you would want to analyse closely next time they run.

    Also in your routine spend a little time looking ahead to the fixtures coming up to see the potential races you could be analysing so you know on Wednesday what you expect to be doing Friday.

    Now when you next settle down to study a race you could already have a slight head start and may not need to look at each runner so extensively, because you’re specialising you’ll know plenty about them.

    As runners come into your specialisation filter say from a class 5 handicap or over from Ireland you’ll have a little more time to study them and get a good handle on the horses that you haven’t seen a lot of.

    Don’t worry about what runners you might be missing because there isn’t enough hours in the day to study them all.

    Hopefully some of what I’m saying helps, my advice would be to find what you do best at and develop a routine around that specific angle.

    #378312
    GingertipsterGingertipster
    Participant
    • Total Posts 26580

    I was wondering if anyone could give me any tips on how to study the form in a quick and efficient manner. I have been following horse racing for the last 6-8 years and am really into it. I have had a certain amount of success using a different variety of selection processes, but I still haven’t found a method that I can use on a regular basis. I like to look at races with around 6 to 12 runners in, and often when studying races like this I find that it is taking me two to three hours just to study one race. When there is a busy Saturday programme this can lead to along time studying. I have read a few books regarding form studying process and alot of the writers suggest spending an hour on a race with this many runners.

    I was wondering if anyone could share there opinions and ideas, on how I could study a race in a quicker and efficient manner.

    Cheers

    Have you got a good form book Gooders?

    When I first started it took me two hours to work out a 100% book. Now a six runner race can be done in fifteen minutes if I know the horses well.
    It would help if I knew what you are trying to achieve.
    Are you trying to produce a 100% book Gooders? An assessment of the fair chances of each runner, so as to find a value selection.

    value is everything
    #405648
    itsawaritsawar
    Member
    • Total Posts 213

    Yeah the first six months were a real grind for me. The first full time that is. After that everything is allot more familiar.

    Studding form. It depends on what methods you wish to employ. Figures, trip, or patterns. Being able to identify the true strength of any race allowed me to the break down a horses ability.

    I recommend software such as Race Form Interactive if you are serious.

    Target on area of racing, 5f @ epson ect.

    Learn your courses.It’s more important than knowing your horses.

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