The home of intelligent horse racing discussion
The home of intelligent horse racing discussion

Potts or Nevison?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 43 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #19437
    Glenn
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1981

    Previous generations divided along their own lines: the Beatles or the Stones, USA or USSR, Abba or Brotherhood of Man…

    If, however, you came of punting age at the same time as me there was only one question to answer: are you a Potts or Nevison man?

    It’s hard for those new to the game, who are now fed on a diet of fast-pic ‘pro-punter’ civilians who can’t even hold a candle, just what punting superheroes these two were. And what’s more they were chalk and cheese. They split the public down the middle and the rivalry got ugly at times.

    In the red corner you had the shwashbuckling ‘Nev’. He’d jump in through the window, leap up onto the Chandelier (pint of Stella in hand) and swing into the baddies with both feet. BANG, ZAP, KAPPOW…..Bare fists were his weapon of choice and he’d always get the girl at the end. Or if not the girl, the slightly weather-worn woman of easygoing reputation.

    In the blue corner you had ‘Pottsy’. He eschewed flash in favour of getting the job done. Like Morrissey’s NHS specs he was so uncool he was cool. Beer with twigs was the drink of choice. Not for him the bare-knuckle confrontations of Nev, he was a gadget man, taking out the opposition by stealth. His secret weapon was hid beneath his elbow patches – a cloud of disorienting gas to be released on the baying crowd, before he proceeded to go in and grab the swag un-noticed.

    They both had their supporters. Nev was a big favourite among the press core, who he occasionally invited into battle with him:

    <!– m –>http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2005/feb/16/horseracing<!– m –>

    Potts fans were more likely to be found in their own cerebral clique, probably in a secret bunker somwhere.

    <!– m –>http://www.smartersig.com/potts.php<!– m –>

    So, who was your favourite punting superhero. Were you a Potts groupie or a Nevison groupie?

    #368410
    GingertipsterGingertipster
    Participant
    • Total Posts 26574

    Bit of an unfair question with Alan being a member on here and don’t know if he’s going to like me saying this but…

    I owe Alan a good deal.
    Got talking to this bloke paddock-side at Wincanton. I did not know who I was talking to, told him how I bet. With a Timeform race card, picking what I considered the best "value" from the best two chances. He explained what "true value" actually is and how any horse can be value (the table). Yes, it’s his fault! :lol: Went away knowing I knew less about the game than I thought and that I needed to expand my racing knowledge. Started reading racing books, including "Against The Crowd, Inside Track" and "Betting The Timeform Way". Bought the Timeform Perspective and made my own tissues.

    I met Alan many years later through a racing aquaintence and recognised the man from Wincanton.

    In truth, suppose my betting patterns these days are more like Dave Nevison than Alan Potts. Backing more than one horse in races. But Alan is (at least judging by DN’s books) a far nicer person.

    Now I sit in the seat Alan used to, in the West Berks Racing Club quiz team, taking on Racing Post, Raceform etc.

    Thanks Alan

    Mark

    value is everything
    #368416
    TuffersTuffers
    Member
    • Total Posts 1402

    I used to see both regularly at the winter Cheltenham meetings. Dave was known to me as ‘London Dave’ and it was years before I realised that London Dave and Dave Nevison were the same person :oops:

    AP’s approach always appealed more to me because I tend to be an ‘Against The Crowd’ sort of person in my thinking on most subjects. The two things I learnt from AP’s books that have stayed with me throughout my punting are keeping records of all your bets and the adage ‘No bet is no problem’.

    I was a SmartSig subscriber which also tipped me into the AP camp.

    I can’t help but admire the ‘balls out’ approach of London Dave though.

    #368422
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    • Total Posts 17718

    I read Against the Crowd but by that time I had worked out a lot of his principles from other sources (doubtless they had filched them from him).

    My interest in the turf picked up seriously about five years ago after years of shot-in-the-dark betting now and then and doing the Derby/National etc. I made the rash vow that I would read up on the game and ‘understand it properly’. I used to see Nevison’s tipping line in the ‘Post and think: I wanna know what he knows.
    I bought his book and realised that far from being what he appeared in his tip-line pictures (a hardnut london wideboy) he was an ex city trader from Halifax with an interest in social work (so he *said*: I never thought his tip line prices demonstrated a social conscience…)
    Anyway, I read his book which excited me but I was none the wiser to how he did it but I got the idea of ‘value’ and soon went my own way in terms of approach. Read the sequel, which gave up a bit about tissues.
    What I liked though was the heroic approach. I knew I’d never be that brave or good at it but it inspired me and I pulled off some goodies with that inspiration. I was working as a news journalist and such was my infatuation with the game I managed to blag a job in racing journalism for a while, Nev’s knowledge becoming mine, as well as Coton’s book and co. Of course, I didn’t know much really. Eventually I went back to news but I feel nostalgic for that period of near all-consuming racing mania and Nev inspired a lot of it.
    I saw him in the bar at Brighton races a while ago – dressed like a 19-year-old. What’s he up to these days?

    #368428
    Mr. PilsenMr. Pilsen
    Blocked
    • Total Posts 1684

    Don’t want to show my hand, so…

    PA

    (anag)

    NAP

    #368431
    kentdougalkentdougal
    Participant
    • Total Posts 277

    AP by a mile for well remembered from his days on the the smartsig forum. I can never understand how Nevison ever managed to show a profit. I did used to enjoy his column in the Outlook though

    #368452
    DroneDrone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5112

    In the red corner you had the shwashbuckling ‘Nev’. He’d jump in through the window, leap up onto the Chandelier (pint of Stella in hand) and swing into the baddies with both feet. BANG, ZAP, KAPPOW…..Bare fists were his weapon of choice and he’d always get the girl at the end. Or if not the girl, the slightly weather-worn woman of easygoing reputation.

    In the blue corner you had ‘Pottsy’. He eschewed flash in favour of getting the job done. Like Morrissey’s NHS specs he was so uncool he was cool. Beer with twigs was the drink of choice. Not for him the bare-knuckle confrontations of Nev, he was a gadget man, taking out the opposition by stealth. His secret weapon was hid beneath his elbow patches – a cloud of disorienting gas to be released on the baying crowd, before he proceeded to go in and grab the swag un-noticed.

    VG Glenn :D

    Red ‘n’ Blue; Black ‘n’ White; Chalk ‘n’ Cheese; Eric The Kid ‘n’ Lancey The Man

    Most punters identify with the red, black and chalky Kid hence Nevison will always be ‘good copy’. I’ve seen him at work on the northern tracks many a time and in the main he bears the countenance of one about to top himself: can eyes possibly be more deeply sunk and sockets more deeply puce? Once bade him a hearty ‘na then’ at York which was reciprocated by the thousand-yard stare characteristic of one shell-shocked by too long a time in the trenches. Old-time rollercoaster it’ll-all-end-in-tears punter, good egg, would enjoy his company after the fifth pint, can’t take him seriously

    Few identified with the blue, white and cheesy Man Potts when he was brought to our attention by Ian Carnaby; the quiet, studious and level-headed are ‘bad copy’ being incapable of providing the trite undemanding entertainment of the good copyist. Happily, twenty years on the quiet guy has gained a small legion of admirers. The big bad world out there may have dumbed-down, our little asteroid has wised-up. New-time flat-as-the-east-coast-mainline punter, good egg, two pint company, can take him seriously

    Yep Dougal, the banter on Smartsig was top-notch craic. Where are they all now? Most grounded at the bottom of the rollercoaster, a few arrived at Waverley Station :?:

    #368459
    TuffersTuffers
    Member
    • Total Posts 1402

    Yep Dougal, the banter on Smartsig was top-notch craic. Where are they all now? Most grounded at the bottom of the rollercoaster, a few arrived at Waverley Station :?:

    The only pro-punter I still see regularly at the races is John Noakes. He’s still got that basilisk stare as he stands watching the horses go round and round in front of him. The little group of acolytes that used to stand with him seems to have slowly disappeared over the years, though.

    #368467
    GingertipsterGingertipster
    Participant
    • Total Posts 26574

    The only pro-punter I still see regularly at the races is John Noakes.

    Soon there won’t be such thing as a silver ring for him to watch the races from. The game is changing so quickly.

    value is everything
    #368489
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    • Total Posts 17718

    Though I’ve read much of their stuff, I wouldn’t claim to know a great deal about either’s success, or otherwise.
    However, I’ve always regarded how many other jobs punters have to hold down to keep afloat as a fair barometer, and that (AFAIK) would put DN a long way second.

    #368494
    aaronizneezaaronizneez
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1696

    [quote="DroneYep Dougal, the banter on Smartsig was top-notch craic. Where are they all now? Most grounded at the bottom of the rollercoaster, a few arrived at Waverley Station :?:

    Smartsig eh ? I still have a few years monthly magazines somewhere. Used to contribute a little on the email forum yet I don’t seem to remember anyones monicker apart from maybe JJE(?) who had trouble with his typing due to his advanced age I think. Memory could be failing though as I’ve passed 40 myself now. I do also remember (I think!) a competition with some cracking prizes for creating either a system or a trend on of all things Greyhound racing.

    Back on topic, like RH I don’t know a great deal about either but if looking for a decent kitchen I’d definitely go with AP

    #368528
    kentdougalkentdougal
    Participant
    • Total Posts 277

    Hi Drone
    Still a few old smartsig members knocking about now under the smartsig banner and forum. Not heard of JJ Egan for a long time but a number of ex smartsigers are on here including AP

    #368586
    DroneDrone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5112

    I believe PJ was in contact with ‘ten thumbs’ JJE a year or so ago and reported him to be alive, well and living the quiet life in Sutton Coldfield

    Sold my collection of Smartsig mags for a not untidy sum to a guy in Australia. Postage was £70 surface mail and took six weeks to reach him!

    #371658
    Glenn
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1981

    I watched

    Inside Nature’s Giants

    the other eve and when I went to sleep had a dream where a follow up series fifty years on was performing autopsies on two giants of the turf whose bodies had been donated to medical science.

    For Nevvo the autopsy revealed iced water in the veins where mere mortals have blood. A gladiatorial forearm and the heart of a lion. The narrator referred to the ‘Nevison mutation’, that was found in Dave and his ancestors. An evolution of the right foot that allowed a swifter flick of the ankle to kick cats. ‘This mutation is unique to all Nevison’s forebears…who have been identified clustered around racecourses born shortly after Dave started traveling the turf in 1993…some have attributed the man’s long dark night of the soul in 2011 to them reaching the age of majority and, due to their identical genetic mindset, suddenly latching on to the same selections he made – wiping out all his profits. If he hadn’t found a second wind in Bodugi he may well have, quite literally, sown the seeds of his own punting demise’

    For Potts, the autopsy revealed an atomic clock where most people’s brains are and two hearts – firstly a broken one. The narrator speculates ‘This may be attributed to the night he got a knock on the door from the Sleepy Hollow Mafia in the early 2000s. They told him they had noticed he’d been engaging in racing punditry without the proper accreditation. Not being a Halifax alumnus Potts was blacklisted and found himself cast out of the book and magazine column writing world soon after.’ A second gladiatorial heart, similar to Nevison’s, had grown in its place. ‘Although initially heartbroken at being cast out of the mainstream. His disciples continued to support him and gave him renewed vigour, culminating in them putting him up to the great ‘Clash of the Titans’ with Nevison in late 2011.

    The narrator went on to describe this showdown, which was initiated by public demand and apparently took place in a bar one night and was decided by a single Bodugi game on a night’s action at Kempton Park. Sadly my toddler woke me up before he revealed the winner. Grrrrr

    We’ve got to get this on. I’ve got to know who wins………..

    #371741
    gamble
    Participant
    • Total Posts 2742

    Topless or Potless
    it is a very hard choice
    and both men have
    had huge ups and downs.

    I liked Alan’s frank admissions
    in the post a few years back
    and he would cost me less in the bar
    so I would go with him.
    I am pretty sure
    he would want
    value for his krone
    and would hand it
    back if there was
    too much froth.

    As our betting styles
    are so similar we
    wouldn’t have to talk much :mrgreen:

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 43 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.