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"…lost it’s action…"

Home Forums Horse Racing "…lost it’s action…"

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  • #1430
    sberrysberry
    Member
    • Total Posts 1801

    we see this put up as an excuse when a horse hasn’t run very well and smokescreens aside, how does a horse lose it’s action and why ?

    what made me think about this was watching the herds of zebras and the like being pursued across the masai mara game reserve by the lions and cheetahs – if an animal can keep it’s action under that sort of pressure on rock hard going without shoes and in temperatures of over 100, why are races horses so soft ?

    #52928
    non vintagenon vintage
    Member
    • Total Posts 1268

    maybe because we’ve bred, cross-bred, and inter-bred them so much that their legs, bones, tendons and muscles are prone to weaknesses and injuries.

    in the wild, a group of racehorses would probably outrun the lions and cheetahs (well, the other zebras really) at first, but their numbers would gradually be whittled down as a result of breaking legs and going lame, imho…

    i feel a hypothetical ‘who would win?’ thread coming on!!!

    #52930
    Wallace
    Participant
    • Total Posts 862

    If you sprained your ankle or knocked you knee this would most probably result in a loss of your normal walking action or gait.  Simple thing for a horse to pick up a knock loading into stalls, jumping or galloping close by others.

    Often when this kind of thing happens to a horse there is no obvious sign until the next morning when it will have heat in a joint or be obviously lame.

    #52933
    heffo
    Member
    • Total Posts 319

    Maybe thats how a lion catches dinner….. grabs the zebra who has ‘lost his action’. :cheesy:

    #52935
    non vintagenon vintage
    Member
    • Total Posts 1268

    Thinking about, I reckon I’ve done the zebras a disservice by assuming the racehorses would be faster.

    I remember hearing something about a small-time trainer at a provincial track in the USA.

    He had a zebra which was actually competitive with some fairly decent horses. I believe it was ridden by an inexperienced female jockey (possibly his daughter even) and ended up winning a big graded stakes race despite being tailed off at half-way.

    Apparently, he landed quite some touch and set himself up with his own yard on the back of it. Just goes to show, eh? Wonder if it thought it saw a lion?

    #52936
    Meshaheer
    Member
    • Total Posts 486

    Haha have you been watching Racing Stripes NV?

    Nice story…shame they couldn’t have made it look a little more realistic though.

    #52938
    non vintagenon vintage
    Member
    • Total Posts 1268

    Good grief Mesh – you’re right!     :o

    LOL @ ‘more realistic’ though, V – it’s a zebra, they let it run, and it wins!!!

    Alongside that, I thought the ‘comedy’ talking flies were pretty believable…

    :biggrin:

    #52940
    SwallowCottage
    Member
    • Total Posts 1008

    I have read that a Zebra can run as fast as a greyhound but I imagine that the top speeds recorded are only when the zebra sees a lion in their rear mirror.

    This website gives explainations of racing comments including why horses lose their action – the most relevant one being that the horse disliked the track<br>http://www.equibase.com/products/cc-comments.cfm    

    #52944
    non vintagenon vintage
    Member
    • Total Posts 1268

    so you could feasibly say "hung like a donkey" about a runner, and not be paying it much of a compliment!!!

    ;)

    #52947
    doyley
    Participant
    • Total Posts 567

    Hello,

    I remember watching a horse racing documentary that could not give a definitive answer as to why we race horses at two and three.<br> Especially at 2 year old, as there bones have not actuallly fully formed, they are literally "babies"

    So a horse that is just two,

    >whose skelelton hasn’t yet finished forming<br>> running on a turning, FIRM track <br>> with another 8 stone animal on top of him<br>>…. carrying a weapon ! :(  <br>> encouraged to go faster..

    will surely, at some point Lose it’s Action !!!

    regards,

    doyley

    #52950
    sberrysberry
    Member
    • Total Posts 1801

    like zebras don’t run until they’re old ?

    #52951
    doyley
    Participant
    • Total Posts 567

    Hello,

    They run when they have to,

    Between, 12:00 and 14:00, Lunch time.<br>                 17:00 and 20:00, Dinner

    ..and avoid the "All You Can Eat" Prairie at all costs! :)

    regards,

    doyley

    #52954
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    • Total Posts 60

    LOL.. wow, what an intresting post…made me laugh anyhow :) <br>zebras and horses come from the same family line ‘equidae’ order; perissodactyla<br>They trot or gallop on strong legs. They have strong muscles and large lungs for running long distances without tiring. <br>When chased by a predator they can gallop up to 55 k.p.h.<br>some facts i thought you might like, however i have no idea on the size of a race horses lungs… <br>also The hoof of a zebra (and other horses), is actually an elongated third toe. Their other toes are not visible. The term perissodactyla means "single toed". :o :biggrin:

    #52955
    DroneDrone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5108

    The Perissodactyls are an ancient lineage of mammals once much more diverse than today. Now all but replaced in their ecological niche by the later evolving even-toed, Artiodactyl ruminant ungulates e.g cattle, sheep, pigs, deer.

    From Wikipedia:

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    The three surviving families of odd-toed ungulate are classified as follows.

       * ORDER PERISSODACTYLA<br>          o Suborder Hippomorpha<br>                + Family Equidae: horses and allies, about 9                   species          <br>                      # Przewalski’s Horse, Equus przewalskii<br>                      # Domestic Horse, Equus caballus<br>                      # Donkey or African Ass, Equus asinus<br>                      # Onager or Asiatic Ass, Equus hemionus<br>                      # Kiang or Tibetan Wild Ass, Equus kiang<br>                      # Plains Zebra, Equus quagga<br>                      # Cape Mountain Zebra, Equus zebra<br>                      # Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra, Equus hartmannae<br>                      # Grevy’s Zebra, Equus grevyi<br>          o Suborder Ceratomorpha<br>                + Family Tapiridae: tapirs, 4 species<br>                      # Brazilian Tapir, Tapirus terrestris<br>                      # Mountain Tapir, Tapirus pinchaque<br>                      # Baird’s Tapir, Tapirus bairdii<br>                      # Malayan Tapir, Tapirus indicus<br>                + Family Rhinocerotidae: rhinoceroses, 5 species <br>                      # Black Rhinoceros, Diceros bicornis<br>                      # White Rhinoceros, Ceratotherium simum<br>                      # Indian Rhinoceros, Rhinoceros unicornis<br>                      # Javan Rhinoceros, Rhinoceros sondaicus<br>                      # Sumatran Rhinoceros, Dicerorhinus     sumatrensis

    <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<

    So catch them while you can:biggrin:

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