The home of intelligent horse racing discussion
The home of intelligent horse racing discussion

Is life just boring nowdays…

Home Forums Lounge Is life just boring nowdays…

Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 25 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #12576
    Pompete
    Member
    • Total Posts 2391

    I don’t necessarily mean on a day to day basis as there are always books to be read, things to be grown in the garden, new foods to cook (I made egg-fried rice last week – lovely it was), places to go etc….but rather is there any wonder left in the world.

    Clearly, there are still the big questions to wonder about such as: if the universe is expanding what is it expanding into? Or, If for the majority of civilisation the orthodox (scientific) understanding of the world has been wrong how can we be certain our current scientific view is correct? You see what I mean. But putting these types of meta-questions aside what else is there left that we sort of share as a society?

    I’ve just watched ‘The Sky At Night’ and during the programme it occurred to me that even as little as 30 years ago there was still a sense of collective wonder about the Solar System, along with the world of natural and social science and I’m not sure that exists anymore.

    I don’t know if what I’ve written makes sense to anyone as I’m not sure it makes sense to me :D

    #247736
    insomniac
    Participant
    • Total Posts 1453

    Think I know what you mean; where you’re coming from :roll: :roll:
    Could it just be the onset of middle-age disillusionment mixed with the realisation that we

    really

    are mortal!
    You ask:-

    …If for the majority of civilisation the orthodox (scientific) understanding of the world has been wrong

    Well, I kind of think that "civilsation" hasn’t got science wrong but has got "religion" wrong. There is no god; is no life-after-death"; so mankind shouldn’t fart around facing Mecca or kneeling in front of crosses or wailing at walls to try and gain an afterlife. I’t aint gonna happen.
    Make the best of what years you’ve got left. Listen to the greatest music you can; read the greatest writing you can and eat and drink well – and try and get as much nookie while you still can ‘cos eternity’s a bloody long time and were all heading for it. Just be thankful that your one and only life has been in a relatively prosperous era in a relatively prosperous country. 98% of all humanity can’t, couldn’t ot won’t be able to say that.
    Of course Pompete you may only be 20 – in which case ignore most of the above because you are immortal,

    #247738
    cormack15
    Keymaster
    • Total Posts 8992

    After I’d read the first post I thought ‘mid-life crisis’ – then read insomniac’s post which supports that theory.

    Get yourself a Harley Pete!

    #247743
    Pompete
    Member
    • Total Posts 2391

    After I’d read the first post I thought ‘mid-life crisis’ – then read insomniac’s post which supports that theory

    Cheeky buggers :D

    I am happy to confirm it is most definately not a mid-life-crisis and thoughts of my own mortality have never occurred to me other than my determination to only leave memories. I came in without a pot to piss in and I’m going out without a pot to piss in.

    No, rather I haven’t explianed myself properly. What I mean is do we now live in a world where the amount of information on all subjects and the speed at which we can now obtain information (via the internet) along with the current ‘End of History’ era we seem to find ourselves in, result in – we have nothing left to wonder about.

    And is this a good thing or our we slowly losing something fundermental to what it is to be human.

    Hope that’s clear :D

    #247751
    Grasshopper
    Participant
    • Total Posts 2316

    I view it entirely differently, Pompete.

    The information age is an enabler for learning and wonderment, rather than a disabler, imo. As much research material as I would ever need….on any subject I care to ponder about…..is only the click of a mouse away. We are fortunate indeed that, if we choose, we can educate ourselves about things which were beyond our reach a mere 15-20 years ago.

    The information may very well well be sitting there, but it takes an act of human curiosity to actually want to go and read it.

    #247754
    % MAN
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5104

    Although we have more information to hand that at any time in the history of mankind, what we as a species do know is only a tiny fraction of what there is to know.

    Taking The Universe as an example, I have absolutely no doubt there are things out there, mechanisms out there that are absolutely beyond our comprehension.

    There are undoubtedly other "dimensions" out there that are beyond our ability to even imagine.

    Even closer to home there are areas of our own world, even ourselves, we are nowhere near understanding.

    #247800
    Drone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5616

    What I mean is do we now live in a world where the amount of information on all subjects and the speed at which we can now obtain information (via the internet) along with the current ‘End of History’ era we seem to find ourselves in, result in – we have nothing left to wonder about.

    And is this a good thing or our we slowly losing something fundermental to what it is to be human.

    Agree with Grasshopper. Thanks to the internet, access to all human knowledge has never been easier – or cheaper – for those wondering and pondering. For example the ever-burgeoning Wikipedia is actually a priceless resource and possibly under-appreciated. Who now needs to sit for hours in a reference library leafing through Encyclopedia Britannica?

    Don’t for one second believe having a ‘sense of wonder’ is restricted to the ill-informed. Education and learning enables depth of thought, the development of tangential ideas and an ability to intellectualise with those who may hold alternative views on the subject of your ‘wonderment’.

    Ignorance is not bliss, education liberates

    Easy access to information is invaluable, but it’s just that: information, and it’s the personal interpretation of this plethora of knowledge now available to more than ever before that is "fundamental to what it is to be human".

    And as Paul says there is just soo….much yet unknown and to wonder about. "End of History" my ar*se.

    Since time immemorial scientists – in particular – have been guilty of saying ‘we now know’: end of. When they should be saying ‘we now think we know’: keep on keeping on.

    #247828
    robnorth
    Participant
    • Total Posts 6212

    No, rather I haven’t explianed myself properly. What I mean is do we now live in a world where the amount of information on all subjects and the speed at which we can now obtain information (via the internet) along with the current ‘End of History’ era we seem to find ourselves in, result in – we have nothing left to wonder about.

    As far as science and ‘things to wonder about’ I suspect that we currently know the ‘square root of b***** all in comparison to what there is to know.

    As a race humans are arrogant enough to think that we have it cracked. We haven’t, and we’ve only just skimmed the surface.

    Rob

    #247870
    Pompete
    Member
    • Total Posts 2391

    Drone, I’m not sure anybody would dispute the general point you and Grassy make but what I’m asking is has/will there come a point when the very fact we know we can access all this information take the wonder out of the world.

    For example, last year in the spring I brought a shrub for the garden, since first planting it out I’ve moved it three times – in the winter when had all that snow it lost all it’s leaves – spring this year I thought it was a
    gonna, there was not a sign of life on it – now it’s twice the size it was and looks fantastic.

    Now, to me when I’m out in the garden potting about and look at this shrub, I feel a sense of wonder. However, that sense is somehow (nowdays) diminished because I know that my wonder could ultimately be explained by biology and chemistry. I am not suggest this knowledge in itself is a bad thing, of course, but depending on our relationship to it has the potential to take away the wonder – and wonder I would suggest is a wonderful thing to feel and have in ones life.

    We feel that even when all possible scientific questions have been answered, the wonder of life remains completely untouched. Of course there are then no questions left, and this itself is the answer

    #247875
    Grasshopper
    Participant
    • Total Posts 2316

    Reckon you’re thinking about things too much, Pompete.

    You might want to smoke some of the shake from that "shrub" you planted, if you’re worried about losing your

    wonder

    lust. :mrgreen:

    #247883
    % MAN
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5104

    – and wonder I would suggest is a wonderful thing to feel and have in ones life.

    Absolutely Pete, but does knowing how something works always take away the wonder?

    We all know the mechanics of conception where the DNA from the sperm and egg fuse, followed by division to form the embryo and then eventual development to a new life.

    Now despite knowing what is happening, is it not still a source of wonder?

    #247890
    Drone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5616

    last year in the spring I brought a shrub for the garden, since first planting it out I’ve moved it three times – in the winter when had all that snow it lost all it’s leaves – spring this year I thought it was a
    gonna, there was not a sign of life on it – now it’s twice the size it was and looks fantastic.

    Now, to me when I’m out in the garden potting about and look at this shrub, I feel a sense of wonder. However, that sense is somehow (nowdays) diminished because I know that my wonder could ultimately be explained by biology and chemistry.

    I share your transcendental emotions about the natural world (cf my pantheistic ramblings) but in my case the more familiar I become with matters biochemical the the more wondrous and perplexing I find ‘life’ to be. How on earth (literally and figuratively) did something so utterly complex, unique :?: :?: and amazing evolve?

    Knowledge and head-scratching increase proportionately and the jaw drops ever-lower in wonder.

    Where Helios in tranquil majesty once steered his golden chariot now slavishly serve the Laws of Gravitation

    …or summat like

    Someone – can’t recall who – bemoaning the age of reason and loss of wonder 300+ years ago

    All nature and natures laws lay hid in night God said: Let Newton be! and all was light

    Alexander Pope 300+ years ago. All was light? Well a candle was lit and it flickered in the dark void of the unknown, but no more.

    Still the case. An ‘ultimate’ explanation of life the universe and everything is eons away, if it is attainable at all to a species of limited comprehension; though we do foolishly like to believe we have the capacity to know it all, hence yes I’d agree

    We feel that even when all possible scientific questions have been answered, the wonder of life remains completely untouched. Of course there are then no questions left, and this itself is the answe

    r

    and by quoting that haven’t you supplied the answer to your query: yes wonder remains how ever much knowledge we might possess

    #247924
    thehorsesmouth
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5552

    Fairly deep $h1t on this thread :shock:

    I agree Pompete that the access to almost everything via the internet and such has greatly taken the wonder out of the world. You no longer feel like "omg, how does that happen?" about anything, because you are one click away from the answer.

    But there are still plenty of things we will never find out about. Some of the things I often wonder about: are bridle horses just plain quitters or are they already trying as hard as they can; are horses like Lough Derg really honest and tough or are they just lazy and dishonest, and need severe stoking up to do anything; do horses know where the winning post is; do horses remember things.

    Still ots of things we will NEVER know about if you ask me, so take some comfort in that. And yes, get yourself a harley :lol:

    #247926
    Pompete
    Member
    • Total Posts 2391

    I share your transcendental emotions about the natural world (cf my pantheistic ramblings) but in my case the more familiar I become with matters biochemical the the more wondrous and perplexing I find ‘life’ to be. How on earth (literally and figuratively) did something so utterly complex, unique :?: :?: and amazing evolve?

    Interesting Drone, a few years ago I did a basis RHS course in gardening and part of the subject matter was how different seeds germinate. It was then and remains now high on the list of the most fascinating things I’ve stumbled across. We may not be able to reconise as such but there is no doubt intelligence is contained with each seed – that’s the view I was left with anyhow…

    Someone – can’t recall who – bemoaning the age of reason and loss of wonder 300+ years ago

    All nature and natures laws lay hid in night God said: Let Newton be! and all was light

    Rousseau – perhaps – but not sure with the God reference.

    We feel that even when all possible scientific questions have been answered, the wonder of life remains completely untouched. Of course there are then no questions left, and this itself is the answe

    and by quoting that haven’t you supplied the answer to your query: yes wonder remains how ever much knowledge we might possess

    I would suggest yes and no :? as it would still be dependent upon being able to appreciate that first moment of wonder and deeper wonder behind the first, as you’ve explained rather than just knowing that somewhere it can explained, so to speak….and it is perhaps this that I fear future generations may be in danger of losing

    Anyhow, Grassy’s right I should be doing something else rather than thinking about this….

    #247950
    Drone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5616

    a few years ago I did a basis RHS course in gardening and part of the subject matter was how different seeds germinate. It was then and remains now high on the list of the most fascinating things I’ve stumbled across. We may not be able to reconise as such but there is no doubt intelligence is contained with each seed – that’s the view I was left with anyhow…

    Nice to know you’re prone to green fingers too.

    Between gazing at horse races, pushing the back button and droning on here I will be found more often than not on gardening leave and it’s an abiding pleasure, infact THE abiding pleasure in my little life.

    The germination of seeds does indeed have a bit of magic about it and the appearance of those tender seed-leaves remains a joy undimmed. As is putting one spud in the ground and receiving ten back three months later.

    mighty oaks from little acorns grow

    All nature and natures laws lay hid in night God said: Let Newton be! and all was light

    Rousseau – perhaps – but not sure with the God reference.

    That is definitely a quote from Alexander Pope.Yep the God reference is unfortunate but he made his point.

    It was the garbled ‘

    Helios

    ‘ quote I couldn’t attribute and having tried in vain to find it on the all-knowing all-seeing web have a feeling I must have subliminally composed it in an unusually lucid dream. Mind expanded perhaps by one of Grasshopper’s herbal concoctions :wink:

    #247958
    Drone
    Participant
    • Total Posts 5616

    from my view the surrounding world on a human-being level for example, such as bankers, social workers, judges, doctors, footballers, and all the other interesting human models, that western society aspires to be and strives to imitate, are becoming more secluded, untangible and hard to understand for layperson’s just trying to educate themselves via the internet or through other means on what it entails and what place or relevence those professions have in a society.

    For example, one teacher sexually abuses a child we could be told, but are we told about the other three million teachers that never did such a thing? No.

    Might this distort some people’s ability to know when there is a danger to their own children at school? probably. Hence, information misinterpreted or blown out of proportion increases

    fear

    of all things.

    Then there is (imo) the information that is not necessarily always misrepresentative of what might be happening, such as you’ll occasionally find in the Daily Mail or Daily Mirror, but which is triviallised to the point where again, one just can’t take it in for what it is,

    for it is meant to trivialise the mind.

    Not entirely sure what you’re driving at Marble but here goes anyway:

    I grew up in a time when the words of experts and the actions of those in authority were more-or-less accepted as ‘they know best’. Or at least my parents did and tried to impress on me ‘my place’ in society.

    The emancipation of that kow-towing silent majority due in no small part to internet access has led to the altogether healthier state of affairs in which the words and actions of our supposed ‘superiors’ are questioned like never before.

    Let’s just use the prosaic example of this forum as an example. Thanks to the meeting of minds the internet has allowed us on here, racing’s ‘authorities’ be they journalists, tipsters, TV presenters, BHA or bookmakers have had the dressing down they’ve long deserved but until recently have all but been shielded from.

    The realisation that – to use your examples – that sexual abuse by a teacher is actually a rare event and that we are peddled a heady mix of trivia, misinformation and fear by the media is actually wisdom beyond your tender years. Your generation are more clued-up, streetwise, less subservient than in the past and it’s my contention that the internet has played an important part in that, by enabling easy communication and dialogue with your peers rather than a reliance on the lectures of ‘those who know best’.

    the only thing we have to fear is fear itself

    FDR

    #248240
    bbobbell
    Member
    • Total Posts 591

    last year in the spring I brought a shrub for the garden, since first planting it out I’ve moved it three times – in the winter when had all that snow it lost all it’s leaves – spring this year I thought it was a
    gonna, there was not a sign of life on it – now it’s twice the size it was and looks fantastic.

    Now, to me when I’m out in the garden potting about and look at this shrub, I feel a sense of wonder. However, that sense is somehow (nowdays) diminished because I know that my wonder could ultimately be explained by biology and chemistry.

    I share your transcendental emotions about the natural world (cf my pantheistic ramblings) but in my case the more familiar I become with matters biochemical the the more wondrous and perplexing I find ‘life’ to be. How on earth (literally and figuratively) did something so utterly complex, unique ❓ ❓ and amazing evolve?

    Knowledge and head-scratching increase proportionately and the jaw drops ever-lower in wonder.

    Where Helios in tranquil majesty once steered his golden chariot now slavishly serve the Laws of Gravitation

    …or summat like

    Someone – can’t recall who – bemoaning the age of reason and loss of wonder 300+ years ago

    All nature and natures laws lay hid in night God said: Let Newton be! and all was light

    Alexander Pope 300+ years ago. All was light? Well a candle was lit and it flickered in the dark void of the unknown, but no more.

    Still the case. An ‘ultimate’ explanation of life the universe and everything is eons away, if it is attainable at all to a species of limited comprehension; though we do foolishly like to believe we have the capacity to know it all, hence yes I’d agree

    We feel that even when all possible scientific questions have been answered, the wonder of life remains completely untouched. Of course there are then no questions left, and this itself is the answe

    r

    and by quoting that haven’t you supplied the answer to your query: yes wonder remains how ever much knowledge we might possess

    You will think I have been on the magic mushrooms or funny baccy when I suggest that you go to Keswick in the Lake District and take the short flat walk along Derwentwater to Friars Crag on a sunny day and just sit and admire the view. Alternatively, get the Number 40 bus from High Wycombe to Thame (Kingston Blount point to point journey) and watch the red Kites at all sorts of locations. Stop at the Cherry Tree pub in Kingston Blount and have lunch then get the bus back and watch the Red Kites again. Both are wonderful

Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 25 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.