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How horse races are organised and consituted?

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  • #12580
    dimdum
    Member
    • Total Posts 6

    Hi all, I new to this forum and I suppose fairly new to horse racing. I’m trying to develop a keen interest in the organisation of the races and match it with data I’ve been compiling for a while so I thought this would be the best place to ask!

    So far my assumptions is that UK horse racing is split into two types (National hunt and flat racing?) and within these are categories like maidens, handicap, seller etc. Are there other types or is this right? I was hoping to find out how all this is organised, who decides the program of events and types of races that takes place? Is there a system where certain grounds are used solely for certain types of races or is it just a matter of each venue taking turns?

    Apparently the type of races depends on the course and what time of the season it is, is this the main factor behind the scheduling?

    Many thanks!!

    #247723
    robert99
    Participant
    • Total Posts 899

    http://www.britishhorseracing.com/gorac … racing.asp

    Will give you a good start on racing structure. If you get a cheap copy of Braddock’s Guide that will fill in more details.

    All Weather (sand) racing is very important in flat racing. It can be raced on frequently, whilst turf courses need time to recover from the damage of each day’s racing.

    There is more on the site as to how BHA organise racing and the courses compete for fixtures. Many fixtures are set by tradition and the pattern of racing.

    #247727
    dimdum
    Member
    • Total Posts 6

    thanks, i’ll have a look through that site

    #247733
    Gerald
    Member
    • Total Posts 4293

    Quite a bit about National Hunt racing was mentioned in this thread recently:-

    https://theracingforum.co.uk/forum/v … hp?t=78752

    #247851
    dimdum
    Member
    • Total Posts 6

    Thanks Gerald, I like your contributions in that other thread, informative cheers.

    I’ve been reading around and still can’t find a concrete answer, is the way they select the grounds based on a traditional scheduling system to make it fair or is it just awarded to those courses that can host it better? I mean I see there used to be a pattern with regards to flat racing and NH. It was seasonal and now (i think) because of all weather tracks its pretty much all year round? Do the types of races depend on the course and what time of the season it is anymore and how is this decided?

    Sorry for the amount of questions, i just find it hard to get my head around it!! :roll:

    #247901
    robert99
    Participant
    • Total Posts 899

    Thanks Gerald, I like your contributions in that other thread, informative cheers.

    I’ve been reading around and still can’t find a concrete answer, is the way they select the grounds based on a traditional scheduling system to make it fair or is it just awarded to those courses that can host it better? I mean I see there used to be a pattern with regards to flat racing and NH. It was seasonal and now (i think) because of all weather tracks its pretty much all year round? Do the types of races depend on the course and what time of the season it is anymore and how is this decided?

    Sorry for the amount of questions, i just find it hard to get my head around it!! :roll:

    You are looking at the wrong end of things.
    Racing has developed over centuries – Newmarket 1622, Doncaster 1610, National Hunt S Ireland in early 1700s, NH to UK in 1830s, first Grand National 1839.

    Early flat racing was the sport of kings and national hunt the sport of the countryside. In Victorian times railways made horse transport possible and large towns grew up so courses were built to suit. Now we have motorways.
    The courses ran their own races under the Jockey Club. The courses decide what type of races they will run within funding constraints and the BHA allocate the fixture list accordingly. Some courses run two types of racing. Lingfield runs 3 types, most do one to suit local needs or have given up one type of racing to do another well. Flat turf racing is about speed and is run in the summer when the ground is drier. Jump racing now in summer if courses can water the ground.

    Rationale is a mixture of tradition, geography, transport, local population and funding.

    #247909
    Gerald
    Member
    • Total Posts 4293

    On the whole, racecourses hold the same meetings with the same races as they held the previous year/season. There is obviously a bit of tweaking to try to improve things.

    On top of that, racecourses can bid to hold extra meetings. I’m not au fait with all the terminology that it used.

    Originally the Jockey Club and the Levy Board were in control because they controlled the rules and the pursestrings.

    Jockey Club got superceded by the British Horseracing Board, which is now the British Horseracing Authority.

    Due to European rules on competition, some of the power was nullified by the introduction of the bidding system for holding extra fixtures.

    #248025
    dimdum
    Member
    • Total Posts 6

    excellent responses!! :D

    Thank you very much, I can see spending time here will be very informative!

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