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  • #11926
    robnorth
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    • Total Posts 6212

    I think ‘mud caulks’ are shoes with cleats on them to give better adhesion on a wet surface.

    #237339
    robert99
    Participant
    • Total Posts 899

    Mud caulks are scewed in shoe studs – toegrabs have a raised front edge to get a better grip on tight, wet tracks when riding on the inner. 1/4 inch bends are made by hammering the back of the shoe to deform it before shoeing.

    New York Racing Association, since Oct. 29 last, announced it will limit the height of grabs on front shoes, while also eliminating bends, jar caulks, stickers (mud caulks), or any other traction device on front hooves.

    Research has proven there is a greater risk of catastrophic injury to horses wearing front toe grabs.

    #237405
    robert99
    Participant
    • Total Posts 899

    Thanks for that. I think I have understood it. In effect it means that the horse is not standing properly thereby putting out the angles of shoulder to hoof and the alignment of the spine if the fronts are higher than the backs. I see that the use of these types of shoes may be banned. Do you think they can cause long term damage to legs, spine and tendons?

    This is an area where there is insufficient knowledge to say what causes what effect. There are screw in pointed caulks that can be applied evenly along shoe (reduce slipping but no extra traction) or the farrier can file the hoof wall to compensate the angle for other types. It is expected that the soft track will allow some sinking under the metal projections to even out the horse’s balance on its support foot. If mud gets stuck under the caulks etc then you lose the extra grip and no longer have a flat shoe surface to land with.

    The move to all-weather tracks in USA was to improve horse safety but as far as we know AW comes up with another type of injury so the horse still can’t run. Far more research is still needed.The worst effects in mud are that a leg gets "stuck" or not withdrawn from the mud quickly enough – that can snap a horse leg or rupture tendons caulks etc may aggravate that problem. A "stuck" front leg gets full on over-reach damage as the rear foot shoe impacts at the back of the foreleg.

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